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Utilising the virtual learning environment to encourage faculty reflection and improve the student learning experience

Winchester, Tiffany M. and Winchester, Maxwell K. 2012, Utilising the virtual learning environment to encourage faculty reflection and improve the student learning experience. In Wankel, Charles and Blessinger, Patrick (ed), Increasing student engagement and retention using immersive interfaces : virtual worlds, gaming and simulation, Emerald Group Publishing, Bingley, England, pp.341-368, doi: 10.1108/S2044-9968(2012)000006C015.

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Title Utilising the virtual learning environment to encourage faculty reflection and improve the student learning experience
Author(s) Winchester, Tiffany M.
Winchester, Maxwell K.
Title of book Increasing student engagement and retention using immersive interfaces : virtual worlds, gaming and simulation
Editor(s) Wankel, Charles
Blessinger, Patrick
Publication date 2012
Series Cutting-edge technologies in higher education : v.6C
Chapter number 13
Total chapters 13
Start page 341
End page 368
Total pages 28
Publisher Emerald Group Publishing
Place of Publication Bingley, England
Keyword(s) virtual learning environment
student learning experience
faculty reflection
student evaluations of teaching (SETs)
Summary Student evaluations of teaching (SETs) are the most frequent form of faculty performance in the classroom, though they tend to be used as summative rather than formative evaluations. In this chapter, a project involving the use of a virtual learning environment for formative, weekly SETs is explored from both the student and faculty point of view at a rural university college in the United Kingdom. This project encouraged student participation in creating the learning environment and faculty reflection on how to improve the student experience. From the student perspective, the weekly anonymous evaluations were useful for providing feedback; however, students tended to only respond if they were not satisfied with the faculty member. The exception to this was that some students were more motivated to complete the evaluation forms if they believed the faculty member was utilising their feedback. From the faculty perspective, the feedback was not as detailed as they had expected, and some questioned whether it was worth the effort of conducting formative evaluations if the response rate was so low. Others used the feedback for reflective purposes, and it was found that those that reflected on their work at higher levels tended to receive a greater year-on-year increase in their end of year teaching evaluations.
Notes Reproduced with the kind permission of the copyright owner.
This article is © Emerald Group Publishing and permission has been granted for this version to appear here. Emerald does not grant permission for this article to be further copied/distributed or hosted elsewhere without the express permission from Emerald Group Publishing Limited.
ISBN 978178902400
9781781902417
ISSN 2044-9968
Language eng
DOI 10.1108/S2044-9968(2012)000006C015
Field of Research 130303 Education Assessment and Evaluation
Socio Economic Objective 970113 Expanding Knowledge in Education
HERDC Research category B1 Book chapter
Copyright notice ©2012, Emerald
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30050731

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.