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Functional imaging to understand biomechanics : a critical tool for the study of biology, pathology and the development of pharmacological solutions

Jamison, R Aidan, Armitage, James A., Carberry, Josie, Kitchen, Marcus J., Hooper, Stuart B. and Fouras, Andreas 2012, Functional imaging to understand biomechanics : a critical tool for the study of biology, pathology and the development of pharmacological solutions, Current pharmaceutical biotechnology, vol. 13, no. 11, pp. 2128-2140.

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Title Functional imaging to understand biomechanics : a critical tool for the study of biology, pathology and the development of pharmacological solutions
Author(s) Jamison, R Aidan
Armitage, James A.
Carberry, Josie
Kitchen, Marcus J.
Hooper, Stuart B.
Fouras, Andreas
Journal name Current pharmaceutical biotechnology
Volume number 13
Issue number 11
Start page 2128
End page 2140
Total pages 13
Publisher Bentham Science Publishers Ltd
Place of publication Bussum, Netherlands
Publication date 2012
ISSN 1389-2010
1873-4316
Keyword(s) biomechanics
functional imaging
function
cell mechanics
lung mechanics
Summary We present four case studies of the literature discussing the effects of physical forces on biological function. While the field of biomechanics has existed for many decades, it may be considered by some a poor cousin to biochemistry and other traditional fields of medical research. In these case studies, including cardiovascular and respiratory systems, we demonstrate that, in fact, many systems historically believed to be controlled by biochemistry are dominated by biomechanics. We discuss both the previous paradigms that have advanced research in these fields and the changing paradigms that will define the progressions of these fields for decades to come. In the case of biomechanical effects of flowing blood on the endothelium, this has been well understood for decades. In the cases of platelet activation and liquid clearance from the lungs during birth, these discoveries are far more recent and perhaps not as universally accepted. While only a few specific examples are examined here, it is clear that not enough attention is paid to the possible mechanical links to biological function. The continued development of these research areas, with the inclusion of physical effects, will hopefully provide new insight into disease development, progression, diagnosis and effective therapies.
Language eng
Field of Research 110320 Radiology and Organ Imaging
Socio Economic Objective 920199 Clinical Health (Organs, Diseases and Abnormal Conditions) not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30050744

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Medicine
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Created: Thu, 21 Feb 2013, 11:12:03 EST by Jane Moschetti

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