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Rapid onset of renal sympathetic nerve activation in rabbits fed a high-fat diet

Armitage, James A., Burke, Sandra L., Prior, Larissa J., Barzel, Benjamin, Eikelis, Nina, Lim, Kyungjoon and Head, Geoffrey A. 2012, Rapid onset of renal sympathetic nerve activation in rabbits fed a high-fat diet, Hypertension, vol. 60, pp. 163-171, doi: 10.1161/HYPERTENSIONAHA.111.190413.

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Title Rapid onset of renal sympathetic nerve activation in rabbits fed a high-fat diet
Author(s) Armitage, James A.ORCID iD for Armitage, James A. orcid.org/0000-0002-3762-0911
Burke, Sandra L.
Prior, Larissa J.
Barzel, Benjamin
Eikelis, Nina
Lim, Kyungjoon
Head, Geoffrey A.
Journal name Hypertension
Volume number 60
Start page 163
End page 171
Total pages 9
Publisher Lippincott Williams & Wilkins
Place of publication Philadelphia, Pa.
Publication date 2012-07
ISSN 1524-4563
0194-911X
Keyword(s) sympathetic nervous system
obesity
rabbits
blood pressure
heart rate
Summary Hypertension and elevated sympathetic drive result from consumption of a high-calorie diet and deposition of abdominal fat, but the etiology and temporal characteristics are unknown. Rabbits instrumented for telemetric recording of arterial pressure and renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA) were fed a high-fat diet for 3 weeks then control diet for 1 week or control diet for 4 weeks. Baroreflexes and responses to air-jet stress and hypoxia were determined weekly. After 1 week of high-fat diet, caloric intake increased by 62%, accompanied by elevated body weight, blood glucose, plasma insulin, and leptin (8%, 14%, 134%, and 252%, respectively). Mean arterial pressure, heart rate, and RSNA also increased after 1 week (6%, 11%, and 57%, respectively). Whereas mean arterial pressure and body weight continued to rise over 3 weeks of high-fat diet, heart rate and RSNA did not change further. The RSNA baroreflex was attenuated from the first week of the diet. Excitatory responses to air-jet stress diminished over 3 weeks of high-fat diet, but responses to hypoxia were invariant. Resumption of a normal diet returned glucose, insulin, leptin, and heart rate to control levels, but body weight, mean arterial pressure, and RSNA remained elevated. In conclusion, elevated sympathetic drive and impaired baroreflex function, which occur within 1 week of consumption of a high-fat, high-calorie diet, appear integral to the rapid development of obesity-related hypertension. Increased plasma leptin and insulin may contribute to the initiation of hypertension but are not required for maintenance of mean arterial pressure, which likely lies in alterations in the response of neurons in the hypothalamus.
Language eng
DOI 10.1161/HYPERTENSIONAHA.111.190413
Field of Research 110201 Cardiology (incl Cardiovascular Diseases)
Socio Economic Objective 920103 Cardiovascular System and Diseases
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30050745

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Faculty of Health
School of Medicine
Open Access Collection
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.