Adaptive autobiographical memory in younger and older adults : the indirect association of integrative and instrumental reminiscence with depressive symptoms

Hallford, D. J., Mellor, D. and Cummins, R. A. 2013, Adaptive autobiographical memory in younger and older adults : the indirect association of integrative and instrumental reminiscence with depressive symptoms, Memory, vol. 21, no. 4, pp. 444-457.

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Title Adaptive autobiographical memory in younger and older adults : the indirect association of integrative and instrumental reminiscence with depressive symptoms
Author(s) Hallford, D. J.
Mellor, D.
Cummins, R. A.
Journal name Memory
Volume number 21
Issue number 4
Start page 444
End page 457
Total pages 14
Publisher Taylor & Francis
Place of publication Abingdon, England
Publication date 2013
ISSN 0965-8211
Keyword(s) Depression
Perceived control
Self-efficacy
Optimism
Self-esteem
Meaning
Reminiscence
Memory
Summary Despite the established effectiveness of reminiscence-based interventions for depression, little research exists into the pathways through which specific reminiscence functions are related to depressive symptoms. Drawing on theory of the mechanisms of change in cognitive-reminiscence therapy, the current study tests the hypothesised indirect associations of adaptive integrative and instrumental reminiscence functions with depressive symptoms and whether these relationships might differ among younger and older adults. Questionnaires were completed by a large community sample of the Australian population. Multiple mediation models were tested in two groups: younger adults (n=730, M age=52.24, SD=9.84) and older adults (n=725, M age= 73.59, SD=6.29). Results were consistent across age groups, indicating that there was direct relationship between these reminiscence functions and depressive symptoms, but that integrative reminiscence is indirectly associated with depressive symptoms through meaning in life, self-esteem, and optimism, and that instrumental reminiscence is indirectly associated with depressive symptoms through primary control and self-efficacy. This study provides support for the relationships between constructs underlying the proposed mechanisms of change in cognitive-reminiscence therapy for the treatment of depression, and suggests these relationships are similar for younger and older adults.
Language eng
Field of Research 170199 Psychology not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 970111 Expanding Knowledge in the Medical and Health Sciences
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30050953

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Psychology
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