Openly accessible

That grave pleasure

Pont, Antonia 2012, That grave pleasure, Axon, vol. 2, no. 13, pp. 1-1.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
pont-thatgrave-2012.pdf Published version application/pdf 167.94KB 14

Title That grave pleasure
Author(s) Pont, Antonia
Journal name Axon
Volume number 2
Issue number 13
Start page 1
End page 1
Total pages 1
Publisher University of Canberra
Place of publication [Canberra, A.C.T.]
Publication date 2012-09
ISSN 1838-8973
Keyword(s) gravity
deconstruction
movement
practice
laziness
rhizome
arborescent
Summary This paper argues that gravity is often opposed to lightness in a conceptual manoeuvre reminiscent of the binaries of a metaphysics of presence (the latter as interrogated by Derrida; see generally 1997). In this paradigm, lightness operates akin to the ‘origin’ or presence, and is deemed to have been contaminated by the arrival of weight, the latter framed as threat to this (presence)/lightness. The paper challenges this conceptualisation, one that arguably dominates quotidian attitudes to the body and its movement capacities. It proposes instead that gravity can be read ‘deconstructively’—in other words, that lightness and weight emerge from and produce one another, and that weight always already operates, and therefore includes lightness. In order to inhabit this desiring-body (a body affected by gravity), particular framings of the body’s internal structures can permit a harnessing of gravity’s vectors of attraction, enabling what the author terms ‘a rigorous laziness’. The latter would involve both an initial attitude and a practice that eschews vocabularies of ‘force’ and ‘effort’, in favour of a ‘close reading’ of structural veracities, engaging strategically with, rather than against, them, in an approach akin to deconstruction’s reading along with a text. Drawing ekphrastically on the structural suggestiveness of Deleuze and Guattari’s rhizomatic and arborescent lenses, the paper finally contends that both these models are at work in human bodies, and that they operate in mutually generative ways. Taken up, this thinking may extend what the human body can do, and, most importantly, its pleasure in such doings.
Notes
Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in Deakin Research Online. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au

Language eng
Field of Research 199999 Studies in Creative Arts and Writing not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 970120 Expanding Knowledge in Language, Communication and Culture
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
HERDC collection year 2012
Copyright notice ©2012, University of Canberra
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30051043

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Communication and Creative Arts
Open Access Collection
Connect to link resolver
 
Link to Related Work
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Access Statistics: 32 Abstract Views, 14 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Thu, 07 Mar 2013, 12:29:54 EST by Antonia Pont

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.