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Creating project-based learning in software

Joordens, Matthew 2012, Creating project-based learning in software, in AAEE 2012 : The profession of engineering education, advancing teaching, research and careers : Proceedings of the 23rd Annual Conference of the Australasian Association for Engineering Education, ESER group, Swinburne University of Technology, Melbourne, Vic., pp. 422-430.

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Title Creating project-based learning in software
Author(s) Joordens, MatthewORCID iD for Joordens, Matthew orcid.org/0000-0003-2253-4428
Conference name Australasian Association for Engineering Education. Conference (23rd : 2012 : Melbourne, Australia)
Conference location Melbourne, Vic.
Conference dates 3-5 Dec. 2012
Title of proceedings AAEE 2012 : The profession of engineering education, advancing teaching, research and careers : Proceedings of the 23rd Annual Conference of the Australasian Association for Engineering Education
Editor(s) Mann, Llewellyn
Daniel, Scott
Publication date 2012
Conference series Australasian Association for Engineering Education Conference
Start page 422
End page 430
Total pages 9
Publisher ESER group, Swinburne University of Technology
Place of publication Melbourne, Vic.
Keyword(s) project based learning
artificial intelligence
software simulation
Summary BACKGROUND : Project Based Learning (PBL) allows students to learn by doing hands on work and thus also again practical skills. Therefore going to software simulation may seem like a backwards step. However, the opportunity presented itself to create a unit on Artificial intelligence (AI). This lends itself it a software approach. An added benefit was the opportunity to create a PBL AI unit for both Engineering and IT students.

PURPOSE : Can Project Based Learning be improved with dedicated, specifically written, software design?

DESIGN/METHOD : After introducing a dedicated software package the student marks and student feedback for the AI unit for a few years before the package introduction until the most recent year was analysed. In the student surveys, 2 key questions where examined: unit material quality and feedback to students. Student comments were also studied.

RESULTS : Student surveys gave a consistently high mark for unit’s material and student marks seems consistent as well but favourable comments increased. The most significant result was that the students’ thoughts about the project feedback had increased significantly, probably due to the inbuilt feedback system in the dedicated software package.

CONCLUSIONS : With an appropriate subject matter a dedicated software package can help students in PBL. Student enjoyment increased which, in turn, increased their motivation.
ISBN 9780987177230
Language eng
Field of Research 120403 Engineering Design Methods
Socio Economic Objective 930599 Education and Training Systems not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category E1 Full written paper - refereed
Copyright notice ©2012, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30051061

Document type: Conference Paper
Collections: School of Engineering
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.