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Flash-floods : genre subversion and the abject erotic in Dorothy Porter’s The monkey’s mask and El Dorado

Royal, Autumn 2012, Flash-floods : genre subversion and the abject erotic in Dorothy Porter’s The monkey’s mask and El Dorado, in Proceedings of the 17th Conference of the Australasian Association of Writing Programs, Australasian Association of Writing Programs, Canberra, A.C.T., pp. 1-11.

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Title Flash-floods : genre subversion and the abject erotic in Dorothy Porter’s The monkey’s mask and El Dorado
Formatted title Flash-floods : genre subversion and the abject erotic in Dorothy Porter’s The
monkey’s mask
and El Dorado
Author(s) Royal, Autumn
Conference name Australasian Association of Writing Programs. Conference (17th : 2012 : Geelong, Vic.)
Conference location Geelong, Vic
Conference dates 25-27 Nov. 2012
Title of proceedings Proceedings of the 17th Conference of the Australasian Association of Writing Programs
Editor(s) Pont, Antonia
West, Patrick
Johanson, Katya
Atherton, Cassandra
Dredge, Rhonda
Todd, Ruby
Publication date 2012
Conference series Australasian Association of Writing Programs Conference
Start page 1
End page 11
Total pages 11
Publisher Australasian Association of Writing Programs
Place of publication Canberra, A.C.T.
Keyword(s) Abject Erotic
Dorothy Porter
Genre subversion
Lesbian writing
Verse novel
Summary When discussing her verse novels, Dorothy Porter explicitly stated that she loved to ‘write bad’. This paper will argue that it was Porter’s engagement with the verse novel form and genre subversion, most notably seen with her detective and crime thriller verse novels The monkey’s mask and El Dorado, that allows for a destabilisation of traditionally established genre conventions, which in turn provide a narrative foundation for Porter’s use of abject erotic imagery.

In both The monkey’s mask and El Dorado there are several types of ‘bodies’ to be examined: the body of the verse narrative, the bodies of the characters subjected to crime, the body of poetry that is referred to as evidence, and the abject eroticised body. Extending upon the studies of Rose Lucas (1997) and Fleur Diamond (1999), this paper contends that it is Porter’s engagement with the abject erotic, as informed by Julia Kristeva’s (1982) theory of the abject and Johanna Blakley’s (1995) discussion of the abject in relation to eroticism, that allows Porter to subvert the phallocentric limitations upheld through the crime fiction genre and offer an alternative representation for lesbian sexuality and desire.
ISBN 9780980757361
Language eng
Field of Research 200525 Literary Theory
Socio Economic Objective 950104 The Creative Arts (incl. Graphics and Craft)
HERDC Research category E1 Full written paper - refereed
Copyright notice ©2012, Australian Association of Writing Programs
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30051108

Document type: Conference Paper
Collections: School of Communication and Creative Arts
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Created: Mon, 11 Mar 2013, 10:59:57 EST by Autumn Royal

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.