Openly accessible

Children's physical activity and screen time : qualitative comparison of views of parents of infants and preschool children

Hesketh, Kylie D., Hinkley, Trina and Campbell, Karen J. 2012, Children's physical activity and screen time : qualitative comparison of views of parents of infants and preschool children, International journal of behavioral nutrition and physical activity, vol. 9, no. 152, pp. 1-14.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
hesketh-childrensphysical-2012.pdf Published version application/pdf 242.52KB 36

Title Children's physical activity and screen time : qualitative comparison of views of parents of infants and preschool children
Author(s) Hesketh, Kylie D.
Hinkley, Trina
Campbell, Karen J.
Journal name International journal of behavioral nutrition and physical activity
Volume number 9
Issue number 152
Start page 1
End page 14
Total pages 14
Publisher BioMed Central
Place of publication London, England
Publication date 2012-12-28
ISSN 1479-5868
Keyword(s) early childhood
parenting
physical activity
screen time
qualitative study
Summary Background
While parents are central to the development of behaviours in their young children, little is known about how parents view their role in shaping physical activity and screen time behaviours.

Methods
Using an unstructured focus group design, parental views and practices around children′s physical activity and screen time (television and computer use) were explored with eight groups of new parents (n=61; child age <12 months) and eight groups of parents with preschool-aged (3–5 year old) children (n=36) in Melbourne, Australia.

Results
Parents generally believed children are naturally active, which may preclude their engagement in strategies designed to increase physical activity. While parents across both age groups shared many overarching views concerning parenting for children′s physical activity and screen time behaviours, some strategies and barriers differed depending on the age of the child. While most new parents were optimistic about their ability to positively influence their child′s behaviours, many parents of preschool-aged children seemed more resigned to strategies that worked for them, even when aware such strategies may not be ideal.

Conclusions
Interventions aiming to increase children′s physical activity and decrease screen time may need to tailor strategies to the age group of the child and address parents′ misconceptions and barriers to optimum parenting in these domains.
Notes This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Language eng
Field of Research 110699 Human Movement and Sports Science not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 920501 Child Health
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2012, Hesketh et al.
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30051112

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences
Open Access Collection
Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 3 times in TR Web of Science
Scopus Citation Count Cited 3 times in Scopus
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 40 Abstract Views, 36 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Tue, 12 Mar 2013, 10:31:40 EST by Jane Moschetti

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.