Utilising silk fibroin membranes as scaffolds for the growth of tympanic membrane keratinocytes, and application to myringoplasty surgery

Levin, B., Redmond, S.L., Rajkhowa, R., Eikelboom, R.H., Atlas, M.D. and Marano, R.J. 2013, Utilising silk fibroin membranes as scaffolds for the growth of tympanic membrane keratinocytes, and application to myringoplasty surgery, Journal of laryngology and otology, vol. 127, no. Supp 1., pp. S13-S20.

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Title Utilising silk fibroin membranes as scaffolds for the growth of tympanic membrane keratinocytes, and application to myringoplasty surgery
Author(s) Levin, B.
Redmond, S.L.
Rajkhowa, R.
Eikelboom, R.H.
Atlas, M.D.
Marano, R.J.
Journal name Journal of laryngology and otology
Volume number 127
Issue number Supp 1.
Start page S13
End page S20
Total pages 8
Publisher Cambridge University Press
Place of publication Cambridge, England
Publication date 2013-01
ISSN 0022-2151
Keyword(s) tympanic membrane perforation
myringoplasty
silk fibroin
graft
keratinocyte
Summary Background: Chronic tympanic membrane perforations can cause significant morbidity. The term myringoplasty describes the operation used to close such perforations. A variety of graft materials are available for use in myringoplasty, but all have limitations and few studies report post-operative hearing outcomes. Recently, the biomedical applications of silk fibroin protein have been studied. This material’s biocompatibility, biodegradability and ability to act as a scaffold to support cell growth prompted an investigation of its interaction with human tympanic membrane keratinocytes. Methods and materials: Silk fibroin membranes were prepared and human tympanic membrane keratinocytes cultured. Keratinocytes were seeded onto the membranes and immunostained for a number of relevant protein markers relating to cell proliferation, adhesion and specific epithelial differentiation. Results: The silk fibroin scaffolds successfully supported the growth and adhesion of keratinocytes, whilst also maintaining their cell lineage. Conclusion: The properties of silk fibroin make it an attractive option for further research, as a potential alternative graft in myringoplasty.
Language eng
Field of Research 109999 Technology not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 970110 Expanding Knowledge in Technology
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30051158

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: Institute for Frontier Materials
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