The politics of coastal policy, planning and governance in Canada and Australia : business as usual, at a distance, or collaborative?

Coffey, Brian and Vodden, Kelly 2012, The politics of coastal policy, planning and governance in Canada and Australia : business as usual, at a distance, or collaborative?, Australasian Canadian studies, vol. 30, no. 1-2, pp. 65-92.

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Title The politics of coastal policy, planning and governance in Canada and Australia : business as usual, at a distance, or collaborative?
Author(s) Coffey, Brian
Vodden, Kelly
Journal name Australasian Canadian studies
Volume number 30
Issue number 1-2
Start page 65
End page 92
Total pages 28
Publisher Association for Canadian Studies in Australia & New Zealand
Place of publication Wollongong, N.S.W
Publication date 2012
ISSN 1832-5408
Keyword(s) coastal policy
sustainable development
coastal governance
coastal zone managment
Summary Canada and Australia are countries with substantial coastal zones which provide significant economic, social and environmental benefits and opportunities. The coastal zones of Canada and Australia also share significant threats such as, pollution, loss of biodiversity, and climate change, while also facing different challenges that are unique to their particular contexts. Effective management of such zones therefore represents a considerable challenge because of the: complexity of biophysical processes; multiple threats faced; uncertainties associated with understandings of such processes and threats, and the multiple jurisdictions and stakeholder viewpoints as to how such environments should be managed. Further, coasts and the sustainability of coastal resources and ecosystems have been argued to represent ‘wicked problems’ such that their governability is called into question. Therefore drawing on recent experiences in coastal policy, planning and governance in Newfoundland, Canada, and Victoria, Australia, this paper assesses the adequacy of current approaches to coastal governance in the two jurisdictions. In doing so we draw on recent policy and governance literature to consider whether coastal policy, planning and governance in Newfoundland and Victoria, reflect a collaborative, neoliberal, or business as usual (ad hoc, top down) approach. Based on such an assessment we consider the prospects for more integrated coastal zone management in each jurisdiction, as well as broader implications for governance and the resilience of coastal systems. It is argued that while both jurisdictions would benefit from a more collaborative approach, the mechanisms for bringing about such an approach would vary and will not come easily in light of institutional and historic barriers.
Language eng
Field of Research 160507 Environment Policy
160510 Public Policy
Socio Economic Objective 960701 Coastal and Marine Management Policy
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
HERDC collection year 2012
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30051406

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