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Commercial influence on Indian public-service broadcasting

Rodrigues, Usha Manchanda 2005, Commercial influence on Indian public-service broadcasting, Australian studies in journalism, no. 15, pp. 219-247.

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Title Commercial influence on Indian public-service broadcasting
Author(s) Rodrigues, Usha ManchandaORCID iD for Rodrigues, Usha Manchanda orcid.org/0000-0003-4688-4625
Journal name Australian studies in journalism
Issue number 15
Start page 219
End page 247
Total pages 29
Publisher University of Queensland, School of Journalism and Communication
Place of publication Brisbane, Qld.
Publication date 2005
ISSN 1038-6130
Keyword(s) public-service broadcasting
privatisation
commercialisation
funding
Summary In the UK, the Conservative Party has been drafting a proposal to withhold part of the consumers' broadcasting licence fee from the BBC and place it in a contestable fund for public-service programming. In Australia, the ABC continues to struggle to meet its funding requirements just when the Federal conservative coalition government is considering a bid to use public funding to engage a commercial consortium to run the country's Asia-Pacific television channel and so take it away from the ABC. These struggles for independence and for an appropriate level of funding are part of the landscape of public-service broadcasting in many developed countries. Those who believe in the public-service ethos are concerned about the potential diminishing value of these great broadcasting assets because of the privatisation and commercialisation. However, this is the story of another public-service broadcaster - Doordarshan in India - which has had to live with severe competition from the skies since 1991. As the former dominant broadcaster in the largest democracy in the world, Doordarshan has survived and revived itself many times in the past four and a half decades. However, it continues to struggle to fulfil its role as a mass medium for education and entertainment. This paper explores the role of public-service broadcasting using Doordarshan as a case study. It asks: Does commercialisation of this public broadcaster mean privatisation by stealth or does it provide healthy distance between the broadcaster and the government of the day?
Language eng
Field of Research 190301 Journalism Studies
Socio Economic Objective 950204 The Media
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
HERDC collection year 2005
Copyright notice ©2005, University of Queensland, School of Journalism and Communication
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30051443

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Communication and Creative Arts
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.