Australia’s initiatives in post-conflict nation building in Iraq

Hassin, Ahmed 2013, Australia’s initiatives in post-conflict nation building in Iraq, in Iraq 10 Years On : Intervention, Occupation, Withdrawal and Beyond, Deakin University, Centre for Citizenship and Globalisation, Melbourne, Vic..

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Title Australia’s initiatives in post-conflict nation building in Iraq
Author(s) Hassin, Ahmed
Conference name Iraq 10 Years On : Intervention, Occupation, Withdrawal and Beyond. Conference (2013 : Melbourne, Vic.)
Conference location Melbourne, Vic.
Conference dates 14-15 Mar. 2013
Title of proceedings Iraq 10 Years On : Intervention, Occupation, Withdrawal and Beyond
Editor(s) [Unknown]
Publication date 2013
Conference series Iraq 10 Years On : Intervention, Occupation, Withdrawal and Beyond. Conference
Publisher Deakin University, Centre for Citizenship and Globalisation
Place of publication Melbourne, Vic.
Keyword(s) Australia
Iraq war
nation building
state building
Summary After decades of growth and development, Iraq has become amongst the worst performing states worldwide as a legacy of successive wars and sanctions despite the rich endowment with ample natural resources and capable human resources. Many observers expected that the “new” Iraq after the US “liberation” in 2003 will be a tolerant and unified nation-state that “with a degree of civil society” will grant and secure the human rights for all the Iraqi people (Gresham 2006: 27). However, due to the external military intervention lead by the US, the Iraq state collapsed after the 2003 war (Diamond 2005) as well as its economic, educational, health systems and infrastructure; and, Iraq’s development indicators are amongst the lowest globally (Hassin 2010). Australia’s controversial joining of Bush’s Coalition of Willing has been discussed by various intellectual studies from different angles. It is discussed in the socio-political discourse from an international relations perspective (Verrier 2003), social resistance to war (Hil 2008), and the implications on the Australian internal politics (McAllister and Bean 2006) and federal elections (Kelton 2008). However, there is scarce evidence about any research engaging with Australia’s roles in post-conflict nation building in Iraq. This article explores developmental roles and initiatives played and funded by Australia in Iraq since the invasion in 2003. Based on Hippler’s (Hippler 2004- 2005) multi-faceted approach to nation building this paper will study Australia’s roles in the three interlinked dimensions or “starting points” for nation building: improvement of living conditions, structural reforms and integration of the national political system.
Language eng
Field of Research 160607 International Relations
Socio Economic Objective 940302 International Aid and Development
HERDC Research category E3 Extract of paper
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30051507

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Created: Wed, 20 Mar 2013, 10:29:03 EST by Ahmed N Abdul Karim Hassin

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