How did I get here? The experiences of female physical education teachers in all boys' schools

Mooney, Amanda and Hickey, Chris 2006, How did I get here? The experiences of female physical education teachers in all boys' schools, in ICHPER-SD 2006 : Abstract Proceedings for 1st Oceania International Council for Health, Physical Education, Recreation, Sport and Dance (ICHPER-SD) Congress, Physical Education New Zealand, Wellington, N. Z., pp. 43-43.

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Title How did I get here? The experiences of female physical education teachers in all boys' schools
Author(s) Mooney, Amanda
Hickey, Chris
Conference name Oceania International Council for Health, Physical Education, Recreation, Sport and Dance. Congress (1st : 2006 : Wellington, New Zealand)
Conference location Wellington, New Zealand
Conference dates 1-4 Oct. 2006
Title of proceedings ICHPER-SD 2006 : Abstract Proceedings for 1st Oceania International Council for Health, Physical Education, Recreation, Sport and Dance (ICHPER-SD) Congress
Editor(s) [unknown]
Publication date 2006
Conference series Oceania International Council for Health, Physical Education, Recreation, Sport and Dance Congress
Start page 43
End page 43
Total pages 1
Publisher Physical Education New Zealand
Place of publication Wellington, N. Z.
Keyword(s) physical education
Summary Historically, physical education and sport were constructed as curriculum practices for boys to explore, channel and hone their masculinity. While much has changed since their induction into the curriculum, there is a prevailing view that sport and physical education continue to operate as powerful conduits to the dominant masculinity. In a climate where the underachievement of boys’ in social and educational contexts is becoming increasingly concerning, much of the literature attributes factors such as a lack of male role models, the feminisation of education and the lack of ‘boy friendly’ curriculum and pedagogy as key contributors to the current dilemma. The role of physical education and sport in the gender socialisation process poses some important questions about the place of female physical educators in this ‘male component’ of the curriculum. Foremost here are questions about the capacity of female physical educators to provide effective learning and socialising opportunities to young males. This paper draws on research into the experiences of female physical education teachers working in all-boy schools to discuss issues of gender, power and pedagogy.
Language eng
Field of Research 130399 Specialist Studies in Education not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 939904 Gender Aspects of Education
HERDC Research category E1.1 Full written paper - refereed
HERDC collection year 2006
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30051511

Document type: Conference Paper
Collection: School of Education
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