Openly accessible

What factors are associated with adolescents' school break time physical activity and sedentary time?

Ridgers, Nicola D., Timperio, Anna, Crawford, David and Salmon, Jo 2013, What factors are associated with adolescents' school break time physical activity and sedentary time?, PLoS one, vol. 8, no. 2, pp. 1-8.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
ridgers-whatfactorsare-2013.pdf Published version application/pdf 160.25KB 53

Title What factors are associated with adolescents' school break time physical activity and sedentary time?
Author(s) Ridgers, Nicola D.
Timperio, Anna
Crawford, David
Salmon, Jo
Journal name PLoS one
Volume number 8
Issue number 2
Start page 1
End page 8
Total pages 8
Publisher Public Library of Science
Place of publication San Francisco, Calif.
Publication date 2013-02-13
ISSN 1932-6203
Keyword(s) accelerometer
adolescent
child behavior
controlled study
family
peer group
physical activity
school break time
sedentary lifestyle
social aspect
Summary Purpose Adolescents' physical activity levels during school break time are low and understanding correlates of physical activity and sedentary time in this context is important. This study investigated cross-sectional and longitudinal associations between a range of individual, behavioural, social and policy/organisational correlates and objectively measured school break time physical activity and sedentary time.

Methods In 2006, 146 adolescents (50% males; mean age = 14.1±0.6 years) completed a questionnaire and wore an accelerometer for ≥3 school days. Time spent engaged in sedentary, light (LPA) and moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) during school break times (recess and lunchtime) were calculated using existing cut-points. Measures were repeated in 2008 among 111 adolescents. Multilevel models examined cross-sectional and longitudinal associations.

Results Bringing in equipment was cross-sectionally associated with 3.2% more MVPA during break times. Females engaged in 5.1% more sedentary time than males, whilst older adolescents engaged in less MVPA than younger adolescents. Few longitudinal associations were observed. Adolescents who brought sports equipment to school engaged in 7.2% less LPA during break times two years later compared to those who did not bring equipment to school.

Conclusion These data suggest that providing equipment and reducing restrictions on bringing in sports equipment to school may promote physical activity during school recess. Strategies targeting females' and older adolescents', in particular, are warranted.
Notes This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.
Language eng
Field of Research 110699 Human Movement and Sports Science not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 920401 Behaviour and Health
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2013, Ridgers et al.
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30051631

Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 0 times in TR Web of Science
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 56 Abstract Views, 54 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Thu, 21 Mar 2013, 14:26:18 EST by Jane Moschetti

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.