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Maternal feeding practices predict weight gain and obesogenic eating behaviours in young children : a prospective study

Rodgers, Rachel, Paxton, Susan, Massey, Robin, Campbell, Karen, Wertheim, Eleanor, Skouteris, Helen and Gibbons, Kay 2013, Maternal feeding practices predict weight gain and obesogenic eating behaviours in young children : a prospective study, International journal of behavioural nutrition and physical activity, vol. 10, no. 24, pp. 1-10.

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Title Maternal feeding practices predict weight gain and obesogenic eating behaviours in young children : a prospective study
Author(s) Rodgers, Rachel
Paxton, Susan
Massey, Robin
Campbell, Karen
Wertheim, Eleanor
Skouteris, Helen
Gibbons, Kay
Journal name International journal of behavioural nutrition and physical activity
Volume number 10
Issue number 24
Start page 1
End page 10
Total pages 10
Publisher BioMed Central
Place of publication London, England
Publication date 2013-02-18
ISSN 1479-5868
Keyword(s) obesity
child
feeding practices
eating behaviors
body mass index
Summary Background Maternal feeding practices have been proposed to play an important role in early child weight gain and obesogenic eating behariours. However, to date longitudinal investigations in young children exploring these relationships have been lacking. The aim of the present study was to explore prospective relationships between maternal feeding practices, child weight gain and obesogenic eating behaviours in 2-year-old children. The competing hypothesis that child eating behaviours predict changes in maternal feeding practices was also examined.

Methods 
A sample of 323 mother (mean age = 35 years, + 0.37) and child dyads (mean age = 2.03 years, + 0.37 at recruitment) were participants. Mothers completed a questionnaire assessing parental feeding practices and child eating behaviours at baseline and again one year later. Child BMI (predominantly objectively measured) was obtained at both time points.

Results Increases in child BMI z-scores over the follow-up period were predicted by maternal instrumental feeding practices. Furthermore, restriction, emotional feeding, encouragement to eat, weight-based restriction and fat restriction were associated prospectively with the development of obesogenic eating behaviours in children including emotional eating, tendency to overeat and food approach behaviours (such as enjoyment of food and good appetite). Maternal monitoring, however, predicted decreases in food approach eating behaviours. Partial support was also observed for child eating behaviours predicting maternal feeding practices.

Conclusions 
Maternal feeding practices play an important role in the development of weight gain and obesogenic eating behaviours in young children and are potential targets for effective prevention interventions aiming to decrease child obesity.
Notes This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Language eng
Field of Research 111199 Nutrition and Dietetics not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 920411 Nutrition
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2013, Rodgers et al.
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30051667

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.