Cultural regionalism and environmental planning and design : charting regionalism in deference to globalism

Jones, David 2012, Cultural regionalism and environmental planning and design : charting regionalism in deference to globalism, in Senvar 2012 : Proceedings of the 13th International Conference on Sustainable Environment and Architecture, Department of Architecture, Duta Wacana Christian University, Yogyakarta, Indonesia, pp. 19-34.

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Title Cultural regionalism and environmental planning and design : charting regionalism in deference to globalism
Author(s) Jones, David
Conference name Sustainable Environment and Architecture. Conference (13th : 2012 : Yogyakarta, Indonesia)
Conference location Yogyakarta, Indonesia
Conference dates 29-30 Nov. 2012
Title of proceedings Senvar 2012 : Proceedings of the 13th International Conference on Sustainable Environment and Architecture
Editor(s) [Unknown]
Publication date 2012
Conference series Sustainable Environment and Architecture Conference
Start page 19
End page 34
Total pages 16
Publisher Department of Architecture, Duta Wacana Christian University
Place of publication Yogyakarta, Indonesia
Keyword(s) environmental planning
indigenous knowledge systems
cultural landscapes
Summary The last 400 years has witnessed Western colonialism spread across the Asian communities and landscape transforming and re-defining their identity, culture, landscape patterns and meanings, as well as their land ethic. Whilst independence has brought forth robust attempts at nationalism it has been at the deference of regionalism and cultural identity. Instead, modernism, economic regeneration and growth, and attempts to define a nationalist image out of the newly created nations that are often a patchwork quilt of pre-colonial empires, are signalling the demise of critical regionalism and Indigenous knowledge systems. This paper considers the changes and cultural transformations over the last 400 years pointing to key dilemmas in regionalist growth, deterioration and stabilisation that are causing a loss of environmental and cultural values, morals and codes. These are the cultural and planning ‘rules’ that originally structured and guided the sustainable life and spirit of community, land and culture as an integrated whole. Particular attention will be drawn to the Indigenous communities of Malaysia, Indonesia and Australia that are struggling to maintain identity and environmental ethic in the shadow of major disjointed and multi-objectival national and international economic growth and digital transformation advances. Several possible answers or mediated strategies are offered, through a cultural heritage and planning lens, that could afford a respect and creative integration of these Indigenous knowledge systems to better inform regional growth and land management strategies so that it was regionally relevant.
Language eng
Field of Research 120599 Urban and Regional Planning not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 950307 Conserving the Historic Environment
HERDC Research category E2 Full written paper - non-refereed / Abstract reviewed
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30051748

Document type: Conference Paper
Collection: School of Architecture and Built Environment
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