Virtual thievery : an insight into the criminal mind of virtual property thieves

Patterson, Nicholas, Hobbs, Michael and Palmer, Darren 2011, Virtual thievery : an insight into the criminal mind of virtual property thieves, in ANZSOC 2011 : Proceedings of the 5th Australian and New Zealand Society of Criminology Postgraduate and Early Career Researcher Conference, Australian and New Zealand Society of Criminology, Geelong, Vic..


Title Virtual thievery : an insight into the criminal mind of virtual property thieves
Author(s) Patterson, Nicholas
Hobbs, Michael
Palmer, Darren
Conference name Australian and New Zealand Society of Criminology. Postgraduate and Early Career Researcher Conference (5th : 2011 : Geelong, Victoria)
Conference location Geelong, Victoria
Conference dates 27 Sep. 2011
Title of proceedings ANZSOC 2011 : Proceedings of the 5th Australian and New Zealand Society of Criminology Postgraduate and Early Career Researcher Conference
Editor(s) [Unknown]
Publication date 2011
Conference series Australian and New Zealand Society of Criminology Postgraduate and Early Career Researcher Conference
Publisher Australian and New Zealand Society of Criminology
Place of publication Geelong, Vic.
Summary Virtual worlds have become highly popular in recent years with reports of over a billion people accessing these worlds and the virtual goods market growing to near $50 US billion dollars. An undesirable outcome to this popularity and market value is thriving criminal activity in these worlds.  The most profitable transgression at the moment in virtual worlds is named Virtual Property Theft.  The aim of this study is to gain insight using an online survey, as to how thieves in these synthetic worlds conduct their criminal activities.  This survey asked questions on: thief profiling, how theft was conducted, times of criminal activity, which items are stolen and distributed, victim targeting and criminal profiteering.  This survey is the first to report an insight into the criminal mind of virtual thieves.  The results of this study will provide a pathway for designing an effective anti-theft mechanism capable of abolishing this criminal enterprise.
Language eng
Field of Research 109999 Technology not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 970110 Expanding Knowledge in Technology
HERDC Research category E3.1 Extract of paper
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30051787

Document type: Conference Paper
Collections: School of Information Technology
School of Humanities and Social Sciences
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