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Is a change in mode of travel to school associated with a change in overall physical activity levels in children? Longitudinal results from the SPEEDY study

Smith, Lee, Sahlqvist, Shannon, Ogilvie, David, Jones, Andy, Corder, Kirsten, Griffin, Simon J. and van Sluijs, Esther 2012, Is a change in mode of travel to school associated with a change in overall physical activity levels in children? Longitudinal results from the SPEEDY study, International journal of behavioural nutrition and physical activity, vol. 9, pp. 1-8, doi: 10.1186/1479-5868-9-134.

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Title Is a change in mode of travel to school associated with a change in overall physical activity levels in children? Longitudinal results from the SPEEDY study
Author(s) Smith, Lee
Sahlqvist, ShannonORCID iD for Sahlqvist, Shannon orcid.org/0000-0002-3714-9533
Ogilvie, David
Jones, Andy
Corder, Kirsten
Griffin, Simon J.
van Sluijs, Esther
Journal name International journal of behavioural nutrition and physical activity
Volume number 9
Start page 1
End page 8
Total pages 8
Publisher BioMed Central
Place of publication London, England
Publication date 2012
ISSN 1479-5868
Keyword(s) transport
active travel
physical activity
school children
Summary Background
Children who use active modes of travel (walking or cycling) to school are more physically active than those who use passive (motorised) modes. However, less is known on whether a change in mode of travel to school is associated with a change in children’s physical activity levels. The purpose of this analysis was to investigate the association between change in mode of travel to school and change in overall physical activity levels in children.

Methods
Data from 812 9–10 year old British children (59% girls) who participated in the SPEEDY study were analysed. During the summer terms of 2007 and 2008 participants completed a questionnaire and wore an accelerometer for at least three days. Two-level multiple linear regression models were used to explore the association between change in usual mode of travel to school and change in objectively measured time spent in MVPA.

Results
Compared to children whose reported mode of travel did not change, a change from a passive to an active mode of travel was associated with an increase in daily minutes spent in MVPA (boys: beta 11.59, 95% CI 0.94 to 22.24; girls: beta 11.92, 95% CI 5.00 to 18.84). This increase represented 12% of boys’ and 13% of girls’ total daily time spent in MVPA at follow-up.

Conclusion
This analysis provides further evidence that promoting active travel to school may have a role in contributing to increasing physical activity levels in children.
Notes Reproduced with the kind permission of the copyright owner.
Language eng
DOI 10.1186/1479-5868-9-134
Field of Research 110699 Human Movement and Sports Science not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 970111 Expanding Knowledge in the Medical and Health Sciences
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2012, BioMed Central
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30051802

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.