You are not logged in.
Openly accessible

An analysis of potential barriers and enablers to regulating the television marketing of unhealthy foods to children at the state government level in Australia

Chung, Alexandra, Shill, Jane, Swinburn, Boyd, Mavoa, Helen, Lawrence, Mark, Loff, Bebe, Crammond, Bradley, Sacks, Gary, Allender, Steven and Peeters, Anna 2012, An analysis of potential barriers and enablers to regulating the television marketing of unhealthy foods to children at the state government level in Australia, BMC public health, vol. 12, no. 1, pp. 1-6, doi: 10.1186/1471-2458-12-1123.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
shill-ananalysisof-2012.pdf Published version application/pdf 163.80KB 90

Title An analysis of potential barriers and enablers to regulating the television marketing of unhealthy foods to children at the state government level in Australia
Author(s) Chung, Alexandra
Shill, Jane
Swinburn, Boyd
Mavoa, Helen
Lawrence, MarkORCID iD for Lawrence, Mark orcid.org/0000-0001-6899-3983
Loff, Bebe
Crammond, Bradley
Sacks, GaryORCID iD for Sacks, Gary orcid.org/0000-0001-9736-1539
Allender, StevenORCID iD for Allender, Steven orcid.org/0000-0002-4842-3294
Peeters, Anna
Journal name BMC public health
Volume number 12
Issue number 1
Start page 1
End page 6
Total pages 6
Publisher BioMed Central
Place of publication London, England
Publication date 2012
ISSN 1471-2458
Keyword(s) unhealthy food
regulation
government
children
marketing
advertising
Summary Background In Australia there have been many calls for government action to halt the effects of unhealthy food marketing on children's health, yet implementation has not occurred. The attitudes of those involved in the policy-making process towards regulatory intervention governing unhealthy food marketing are not well understood. The objective of this research was to understand the perceptions of senior representatives from Australian state and territory governments, statutory authorities and non-government organisations regarding the feasibility of state-level government regulation of television marketing of unhealthy food to children in Australia.

Method Data from in-depth semi-structured interviews with senior representatives from state and territory government departments, statutory authorities and non-government organisations (n=22) were analysed to determine participants' views about regulation of television marketing of unhealthy food to children at the state government level. Data were analysed using content and thematic analyses.

Results Regulation of television marketing of unhealthy food to children was supported as a strategy for obesity prevention. Barriers to implementing regulation at the state level were: the perception that regulation of television advertising is a Commonwealth, not state/territory, responsibility; the power of the food industry and; the need for clear evidence that demonstrates the effectiveness of regulation. Evidence of community support for regulation was also cited as an important factor in determining feasibility.

Conclusions The regulation of unhealthy food marketing to children is perceived to be a feasible strategy for obesity prevention however barriers to implementation at the state level exist. Those involved in state-level policy making generally indicated a preference for Commonwealth-led regulation. This research suggests that implementation of regulation of the television marketing of unhealthy food to children should ideally occur under the direction of the Commonwealth government. However, given that regulation is technically feasible at the state level, in the absence of Commonwealth action, states/territories could act independently. The relevance of our findings is likely to extend beyond Australia as unhealthy food marketing to children is a global issue.
Notes This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Language eng
DOI 10.1186/1471-2458-12-1123
Field of Research 111799 Public Health and Health Services not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 920501 Child Health
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2012, Chung et al.
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30051966

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Population Health
Open Access Collection
Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 7 times in TR Web of Science
Scopus Citation Count Cited 7 times in Scopus
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 267 Abstract Views, 90 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Tue, 16 Apr 2013, 15:17:40 EST by Jane Moschetti

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.