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Tracking of dietary intakes in early childhood : the Melbourne InFANT program

Lioret, S., McNaughton, S. A., Spence, A. C., Crawford, D. and Campbell, K. J. 2013, Tracking of dietary intakes in early childhood : the Melbourne InFANT program, European journal of clinical nutrition, vol. 67, no. 3, pp. 275-281.

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Title Tracking of dietary intakes in early childhood : the Melbourne InFANT program
Author(s) Lioret, S.
McNaughton, S. A.
Spence, A. C.
Crawford, D.
Campbell, K. J.
Journal name European journal of clinical nutrition
Volume number 67
Issue number 3
Start page 275
End page 281
Total pages 7
Publisher Nature Publishing Group
Place of publication London, England
Publication date 2013-03
ISSN 0954-3007
1476-5640
Keyword(s) food intake
nutrient intake
infant
toddler
tracking
Summary Background/Objectives: The objectives of the present study were to describe food and nutrient intakes in children aged 9 and 18 months, and to assess tracking of intakes between these two ages.

Subjects/Methods: Participants were 177 children of first-time mothers from the control arm of the Melbourne Infant Feeding Activity and Nutrition Trial (InFANT) Program. Dietary intake was collected at 9 and 18 months using three 24 h diet recalls. Tracking was assessed for food and nutrient intakes using logistic regression analysis and estimating partial correlation coefficients, respectively.

Results: Although overall nutrient intakes estimated in this study did not indicate a particular risk of nutrient deficiency, our findings suggest that consumption of energy-dense, nutrient-poor foods occurred as early as 9 months of age, with some of these foods tracking highly over the weaning period. Intakes of healthier foods such as fruits, vegetables, dairy products, eggs, fish and water were also relatively stable over this transition from infancy to toddlerhood, along with moderate tracking for riboflavin, iodine, fibre, calcium and iron. Tracking was low but close to ρ=0.3 for zinc, magnesium and potassium intakes.

Conclusions: The tracking of energy-dense, nutrient-poor foods has important implications for public health, given the development of early eating behaviours is likely to be modifiable. At this stage of life, dietary intakes are largely influenced by the foods parents provide, parental feeding practices and modelling. This study supports the importance of promoting healthy dietary trajectories from infancy.
Language eng
Field of Research 111199 Nutrition and Dietetics not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 920411 Nutrition
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2013, Nature Publishing Group
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30051968

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.