You are not logged in.
Openly accessible

Developing customer-focused public sector rewards schemes : evidence from the Botswana government's performance based reward system (PBRS)

Kealesitse, Botshabelo, O'Mahony, Barry, Lloyd-Walker, Beverley and Polonsky, Michael Jay 2013, Developing customer-focused public sector rewards schemes : evidence from the Botswana government's performance based reward system (PBRS), International journal of public sector manangement, vol. 26, no. 1, pp. 33-55, doi: 10.1108/09513551311293426.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
polonsky-developingcustomer-post-2013.pdf Post-print version application/pdf 902.42KB 273

Title Developing customer-focused public sector rewards schemes : evidence from the Botswana government's performance based reward system (PBRS)
Author(s) Kealesitse, Botshabelo
O'Mahony, Barry
Lloyd-Walker, Beverley
Polonsky, Michael JayORCID iD for Polonsky, Michael Jay orcid.org/0000-0003-2395-1311
Journal name International journal of public sector manangement
Volume number 26
Issue number 1
Start page 33
End page 55
Total pages 23
Publisher Emerald Group Publishing
Place of publication Bingley, England
Publication date 2013
ISSN 0951-3558
1758-6666
Keyword(s) public sector management
service delivery
performance measurement (quality)
Botswana
performance management
customer services quality
Summary Purpose – Governmental agencies are interested in improving the quality of their service delivery. One tool that has been used to manage their performance is performance based reward schemes (PBRS). The aim of this paper is to examine the degree to which a sample of these plans, used within the Botswana public sector, is customer-focused. Being more customer-focused should deliver improved public sector service quality.

Design/methodology/approach – This study carried out an evaluation of a sample of Botswana PBRS plans, using multidimensional content analysis undertaken by four expert “evaluators”, to identify the degree to which the PBRS were customer-focused.

Findings – Classifying PBRS plans as being customer-focused was difficult, as the plans had few objectives related to customer experiences or outcomes. Those that did had poorly defined performance objectives, their targets were not specific, or there was limited explicit role responsibility. Thus, PBRS plans seemed not to focus on improving customer outcomes.

Research limitations/implications – The PBRS evaluated do not appear to be customer-focused and, thus, would have limited ability to improve customer experiences (i.e. public sector quality). Further research is needed in other countries to see whether these results are generalisable, and whether service levels vary with more customer-focused PBRS plans.

Practical implications – The results suggest improvements that could be adopted by organisations seeking to make their PBRS schemes customer-focused.

Originality/value – Extensive research suggests that PBRS plans can be used to improve service quality. Most of the studies have focused on the employees' perspectives and have not looked at the degree of customer orientation within the plans.
Notes Reproduced with the kind permission of the copyright owner.
Language eng
DOI 10.1108/09513551311293426
Field of Research 150599 Marketing not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 910403 Marketing
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2013, Emerald Group Publishing Limited
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30052097

Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 0 times in TR Web of Science
Scopus Citation Count Cited 1 times in Scopus
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 351 Abstract Views, 280 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Tue, 23 Apr 2013, 12:08:16 EST by Aysun Alpyurek

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.