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The relationship between attachment style, anxiety sensitivity and interpretive bias among adolescent nonclinical panickers

Austin, David W., Jamieson, Rachel S., Richards, Jeffrey C. and Winkelman, John 2006, The relationship between attachment style, anxiety sensitivity and interpretive bias among adolescent nonclinical panickers, Behaviour change, vol. 23, no. 1, pp. 31-41.

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Title The relationship between attachment style, anxiety sensitivity and interpretive bias among adolescent nonclinical panickers
Author(s) Austin, David W.ORCID iD for Austin, David W. orcid.org/0000-0002-1296-3555
Jamieson, Rachel S.
Richards, Jeffrey C.
Winkelman, John
Journal name Behaviour change
Volume number 23
Issue number 1
Start page 31
End page 41
Total pages 11
Publisher Cambridge University Press
Place of publication Cambridge, England
Publication date 2006
ISSN 0813-4839
Summary Elevated anxiety sensitivity and the tendency to catastrophically misinterpret ambiguous bodily sensations has been demonstrated in people who experience nonclinical levels of panic (Richards, Austin, & Alvarenga, 2001), and anxiety sensitivity has been shown to be associated with insecure attachment in adolescents and young adults (Weems, Berman, Silverman, and Saavedra, 2001). This study investigated the relationship between attachment style, anxiety sensitivity and catastrophic misinterpretation among 11 nonclinical panickers and 58 nonanxious controls aged 18 to 19 years. Participants completed the Brief Bodily Sensations Interpretation Questionnaire (BBSIQ), Anxiety Sensitivity Index (ASI) and an attachment questionnaire. The hypothesis that insecurely attached individuals would demonstrate greater catastrophic misinterpretation and higher anxiety sensitivity than securely attached individuals was not supported; however, nonclinical panickers gave more anxiety-related interpretations of ambiguous internal stimuli than nonanxious controls. Results do not support the notion that attachment style is related to anxiety sensitivity or catastrophic misinterpretation (regardless of panic experience). Results do, however, support the notion that anxiety-related misinterpretation of ambiguous somatic sensations precedes the onset of panic disorder.
Language eng
Field of Research 179999 Psychology and Cognitive Sciences not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 970117 Expanding Knowledge in Psychology and Cognitive Sciences
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2006, Cambridge University Press
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30052200

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Psychology
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.