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Faecal microbiota of individuals with autism spectrum disorder

Gondalia, Shakuntla V., Palombo, Enzo A., Knowles, Simon R. and Austin, David W. 2010, Faecal microbiota of individuals with autism spectrum disorder, E-journal of applied psychology : clinical and social issues, vol. 6, no. 2, pp. 24-29, doi: 10.7790/ejap.v6i2.213.

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Title Faecal microbiota of individuals with autism spectrum disorder
Author(s) Gondalia, Shakuntla V.
Palombo, Enzo A.
Knowles, Simon R.
Austin, David W.ORCID iD for Austin, David W. orcid.org/0000-0002-1296-3555
Journal name E-journal of applied psychology : clinical and social issues
Volume number 6
Issue number 2
Start page 24
End page 29
Total pages 6
Publisher Swinburne University of Technology
Place of publication Melbourne, Vic.
Publication date 2010
ISSN 1832-7931
Summary Many children with autistic spectrum disorders (ASDs) suffer from gastrointestinal problems such as diarrhoea, constipation and abdominal pain. Such symptoms may be due to a disruption of the indigenous gut microbiota promoting the overgrowth of potentially pathogenic micro-organisms. These observations have stimulated investigations into possible abnormalities of intestinal microbiota in autistic patients. The purpose of the present study was to determine if a relationship exists between ASD severity (mild – severe) and GI microbial populations. The faecal microbiota of 22 male and 6 female participants with ASDs (aged 7 ± 6 years) were analyzed by standard microbial culture methods and compared within-group (based on ASD severity) and with a standard laboratory reference range. Comparisons between children with mild ASD and those with moderate to severe ASD, as well as comparisons to a neurotypical control group previously reported, revealed that no significant differences appear to exist in the composition of the gut microbiota. Nevertheless, examination of each individual’s gut microbial composition showed 10 cases of unusual findings witch means 1out of 3 cases have unusual microbiota. Our data do not support consistent GI microbial abnormalities in ASD children, but the findings do suggest that aberrations may be found in a minority subset of ASD children. Further studies are required to determine the possible association between the microbiota and gastrointestinal dysfunctions in a subset of children with both ASD and gastro-intestinal problems.
Language eng
DOI 10.7790/ejap.v6i2.213
Field of Research 179999 Psychology and Cognitive Sciences not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 970117 Expanding Knowledge in Psychology and Cognitive Sciences
HERDC Research category C2.1 Other contribution to refereed journal
Copyright notice ©2010, Swinburne University of Technology, Faculty of Life and Social Sciences
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30052216

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Psychology
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.