You are not logged in.

Internet cognitive behavioural therapy for panic disorder : does the inclusion of stress management information improve end-state functioning?

Richards, Jeffrey C., Klein, Britt and Austin, David W. 2006, Internet cognitive behavioural therapy for panic disorder : does the inclusion of stress management information improve end-state functioning?, Clinical psychologist, vol. 10, no. 1, pp. 2-15, doi: 10.1080/13284200500378795.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads

Title Internet cognitive behavioural therapy for panic disorder : does the inclusion of stress management information improve end-state functioning?
Author(s) Richards, Jeffrey C.
Klein, Britt
Austin, David W.ORCID iD for Austin, David W. orcid.org/0000-0002-1296-3555
Journal name Clinical psychologist
Volume number 10
Issue number 1
Start page 2
End page 15
Total pages 14
Publisher Wiley
Place of publication London, England
Publication date 2006
ISSN 1328-4207
1742-9552
Keyword(s) CBT
internet-based therapy
panic disorder
Summary Previous research has established Internet-based cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) for panic disorder (PD) as effective in reducing panic severity and frequency. There is evidence, however, that such programs are less effective at improving overall end-state functioning, defined by a PD clinician severity rating of ≤2 and panic free. In order to test the effect on end-state functioning of the incorporation of stress management material within a CBT program for PD, 32 people with PD were randomised to either Internet-based CBT (PO1), Internet-based CBT plus stress management (PO2) or an Internet-based information-only control condition (IC). Both CBT treatments were more effective at posttreatment assessment than the control condition in reducing PD severity, panic and agoraphobia-related cognition, negative affect and self-ratings of health. PO2 was more effective than PO1 at posttreatment assessment on PD severity and general anxiety, although at 3-month follow-up these differences were no longer apparent. This study provides further support for the efficacy of Internet-based CBT for PD and suggests that although the incorporation of stress management material confers short-term advantages over a standard program, it is not associated with any longer term improvements on panic severity and related cognitions, negative affect, general wellbeing and end-state functioning.
Language eng
DOI 10.1080/13284200500378795
Field of Research 179999 Psychology and Cognitive Sciences not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 970117 Expanding Knowledge in Psychology and Cognitive Sciences
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2006, Wiley-Blackwell Publishing
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30052227

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Psychology
Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 0 times in TR Web of Science
Scopus Citation Count Cited 0 times in Scopus
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 186 Abstract Views, 0 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Wed, 01 May 2013, 14:12:32 EST

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.