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Predicting breakfast consumption: a comparison of the theory of planned behaviour and the health action process approach

Mullan, Barbara, Wong, Cara, Kothe, Emily and MacCann, Carolyn 2013, Predicting breakfast consumption: a comparison of the theory of planned behaviour and the health action process approach, British food journal, vol. 115, no. 11, pp. 1638-1657, doi: 10.1108/BFJ-05-2011-0127.

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Title Predicting breakfast consumption: a comparison of the theory of planned behaviour and the health action process approach
Author(s) Mullan, Barbara
Wong, Cara
Kothe, EmilyORCID iD for Kothe, Emily orcid.org/0000-0003-1210-0554
MacCann, Carolyn
Journal name British food journal
Volume number 115
Issue number 11
Start page 1638
End page 1657
Total pages 20
Publisher Emerald Group Publishing
Place of publication Bingley, England
Publication date 2013
ISSN 0007-070X
1758-4108
Keyword(s) health action process approach
breakfast consumption
theory of planned behaviour
self-efficacy
Summary Purpose: 
Breakfast consumption is associated with a range of beneficial health outcomes including improved overall diet quality, lower BMI, decreased risk of chronic disease, and improved cognitive function. Although there are many models of health and social behaviour, there is a paucity of research utilising these in breakfast consumption and very few studies that directly compare these models. This study compares the Theory of Planned Behaviour (TPB) and the Health Action Process Approach (HAPA) in predicting breakfast consumption.

Methodology:
University students (N=102; M = 19.5 years) completed a questionnaire measuring demographics, TPB and HAPA motivational variables, and intentions. Behaviour and HAPA volitional variables were measured four weeks later.

Findings:
Using structural equation modelling, it was found that the TPB model was a superior fit to the data across a range of model indices compared to the HAPA. Both models significantly predicted both intentions and behaviour at follow up; however, the TPB predicted a higher proportion of the variance in breakfast consumption (47.6%) than the HAPA (44.8%). Further, the volitional variables did not mediate the intention-behaviour gap, and the data were not an adequate statistical fit to the model compared to the TPB.

Research Implications:
The results support the use of the TPB and shows that that some aspects of the HAPA are useful in predicting breakfast consumption, suggesting that risk perception and self-efficacy be targeted in interventions to increase behaviour. The volitional variables did not appear to mediate breakfast consumption indicating that intention is still the strongest predictor, at least in this behaviour

Originality:
The current study is the first to compare the TPB and HAPA in predicting breakfast consumption
Language eng
DOI 10.1108/BFJ-05-2011-0127
Field of Research 179999 Psychology and Cognitive Sciences not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 970117 Expanding Knowledge in Psychology and Cognitive Sciences
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2013, Emerald
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30052247

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Psychology
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.