You are not logged in.

Transdermal estrogen patches for aggressive behavior in male patients with dementia : a randomized, controlled trial

Hall, Kathryn A., Keks, Nicholas A. and O’Connor, Daniel W. 2005, Transdermal estrogen patches for aggressive behavior in male patients with dementia : a randomized, controlled trial, International psychogeriatrics: the official journal of the International Psychogeriatric Association, vol. 17, no. 2, pp. 165-178, doi: 10.1017/S1041610205001535.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads

Title Transdermal estrogen patches for aggressive behavior in male patients with dementia : a randomized, controlled trial
Author(s) Hall, Kathryn A.ORCID iD for Hall, Kathryn A. orcid.org/0000-0001-8648-0313
Keks, Nicholas A.
O’Connor, Daniel W.
Journal name International psychogeriatrics: the official journal of the International Psychogeriatric Association
Volume number 17
Issue number 2
Start page 165
End page 178
Total pages 14
Publisher Cambridge University Press
Place of publication Cambridge, England
Publication date 2005
ISSN 1041-6102
1741-203X
Keyword(s) dementia
aggressive behavior
transdermal estrogen patches
estrogen
males
Summary Objectives: To investigate the efficacy and tolerability of transdermal estrogen patches for the adjunctive treatment of aggressive behavior in male patients with advanced dementia. Methods: The study was designed as an 8-week, randomized, controlled trial in acute aged psychiatry inpatient units and specialized nursing homes in Melbourne, Australia, between 1998 and 1999. The participants were 27 men with established dementia, identified as displaying aggressive behavior not responding to treatment for at least 2 weeks prior to referral. The instruments used to measure aggressive behavior were the Rating Scale for Aggressive Behavior in the Elderly (RAGE), the Cornell Scale for Depression in Dementia (CSDD) and the Mini-mental State Examination (MMSE). Physical examination was performed and biochemistry and serum hormone concentrations were measured at baseline and at 8 weeks. Concomitant psychotropic medication use was recorded and analyzed. Results: There was no significant difference in aggressive behavior at 8 weeks, but significant “rebound” in aggressive behavior (change in scores between week 8 and week 10, p<0.009) and benzodiazepine use in the estrogen group (p<0.03), following removal of the patches. Only behavioral items of the CSDD improved in the experimental group (p=0.031). The use of patches was associated with a significant rise in serum estrogen (p<0.001) but not with a significant decrease in serum testosterone (p=0.077). There were no adverse effects associated with their use. Conclusions: The use of transdermal estrogen yielding up to 100μg per day was not associated with discernable improvement in aggressive behavior in men with advanced dementia. Small subject numbers, multiple variables and a lack of statistical power impair interpretation of these results. However, the tolerability and apparent rebound effect on removal of patches indicate the need for larger studies in this area.
Language eng
DOI 10.1017/S1041610205001535
Field of Research 179999 Psychology and Cognitive Sciences not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 970117 Expanding Knowledge in Psychology and Cognitive Sciences
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30052318

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Psychology
Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 14 times in TR Web of Science
Scopus Citation Count Cited 19 times in Scopus
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 209 Abstract Views, 0 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Tue, 07 May 2013, 14:06:01 EST

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.