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Validity of the Beck Depression Inventory as a screening tool for a clinical mood disorder in Bariatric surgery candidates

Hayden, Melissa J., Brown, Wendy A., Brennan, Leah and O’Brien, Paul E. 2012, Validity of the Beck Depression Inventory as a screening tool for a clinical mood disorder in Bariatric surgery candidates, Obesity surgery, vol. 22, no. 11, pp. 1666-1675, doi: 10.1007/s11695-012-0682-4.

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Title Validity of the Beck Depression Inventory as a screening tool for a clinical mood disorder in Bariatric surgery candidates
Author(s) Hayden, Melissa J.ORCID iD for Hayden, Melissa J. orcid.org/0000-0002-4837-5894
Brown, Wendy A.
Brennan, Leah
O’Brien, Paul E.
Journal name Obesity surgery
Volume number 22
Issue number 11
Start page 1666
End page 1675
Total pages 10
Publisher Springer
Place of publication Berlin, Germany
Publication date 2012
ISSN 0960-8923
Keyword(s) weight loss
psychology
quality of life
depression
Summary Background : The Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) is one of the most commonly used instruments to assess depression in persons with obesity. While it has been validated in normal and psychiatric populations, in obese populations, its validity remains uncertain. This study aimed to investigate the validity and reliability of the BDI-IA and BDI-II in severely obese bariatric surgery candidates.

Methods : Consecutive new candidates at a bariatric surgery clinic were invited to participate in the study by their consulting surgeon. All candidates were assessed using the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Disorders (SCID-I); 118 completed the BDI-IA and 83 completed the BDI-II. Two hundred one patients (response rate, 88 %) participated in the study. The current sample (82 % female) had an average body mass index of 42.83 ± 6.34 and an average age of 45 ± 12 years.

Results : Based on the SCID-I, 54 candidates (26.9 %) met the criteria for a mood disorder, with 37 meeting the criteria for current major depressive disorder. Individuals diagnosed with a clinical mood disorder had significantly higher scores on the BDI (BDI-IA, 23.59 ± 9.69 vs. 12.76 ± 8.29; BDI-II, 22.93 ± 5.22 vs. 11.25 ± 8.44). Our results indicated that, as a screening tool for a clinical mood disorder, the BDI-II had an optimal cutoff of 13, with a sensitivity of 100 and specificity of 67.75.

Conclusions : Results indicated that the BDI-IA should not be used as a tool to measure depressive symptomatology in obese bariatric surgery candidates. No cutoff was identified with adequate sensitivity and specificity, and over 20 % of patients were misclassified. As a screening tool for a clinical mood disorder, the BDI-II was adequate; however, prevalence rates were significantly overestimated.
Language eng
DOI 10.1007/s11695-012-0682-4
Field of Research 179999 Psychology and Cognitive Sciences not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 970117 Expanding Knowledge in Psychology and Cognitive Sciences
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30052355

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Psychology
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