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Raised CRP levels in obese patients : symptoms of depression have an independent positive association

Dixon, John B., Hayden, Melissa J., Lambert, Gavin W., Dawood, Tye, Anderson, Margaret L., Dixon, Maureen E. and O’Brien, Paul E. 2008, Raised CRP levels in obese patients : symptoms of depression have an independent positive association, Obesity, vol. 16, no. 9, pp. 2010-2015, doi: 10.1038/oby.2008.271.

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Title Raised CRP levels in obese patients : symptoms of depression have an independent positive association
Author(s) Dixon, John B.
Hayden, Melissa J.ORCID iD for Hayden, Melissa J. orcid.org/0000-0002-4837-5894
Lambert, Gavin W.
Dawood, Tye
Anderson, Margaret L.
Dixon, Maureen E.
O’Brien, Paul E.
Journal name Obesity
Volume number 16
Issue number 9
Start page 2010
End page 2015
Total pages 6
Publisher Nature Publishing Group
Place of publication New York, N. Y.
Publication date 2008
ISSN 1930-7381
1930-739X
Summary Background: Depression and obesity, the two common ailments of modern society, are associated with increased risk of coronary artery disease and raised C-reactive protein (CRP) levels. Are the effects of depression and obesity related or do they influence CRP levels independently?

Objective: In 493 consecutive patients presenting for obesity surgery, we explored the relationship between symptoms of depression and raised CRP levels after controlling for confounding factors.

Methods and Procedures: Depression was measured using the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI). Confounding variables were age, gender, BMI, waist and hip measures, smoking and alcohol habits, medications, biochemical measures of the metabolic syndrome, and indirect measures of insulin resistance. General linear regression sought variables independently associated with CRP levels.

Results: These patients had a BMI range from 31 to 91 kg/m2, participants age ranged from 14 to 71 years, and 76% were women. The median CRP concentration was 7.7 mg/l (interquartile range: 3.9–14), 40% had an abnormally raised concentration (>10 mg/l). The mean BDI score was 17.0 ± 9.0, indicating symptoms of moderate depression. We found five independent factors associated with raised CRP levels. In order of strength of association, these were: higher BMI (β = 0.36, P < 0.001), female gender (β = −0.19, P < 0.001), estrogen therapy (β = 0.18, P < 0.001), higher BDI score (β = 0.11, P = 0.01), and insulin resistance index (β = 0.11, P = 0.01), and with a combined R 2 = 0.24, (P < 0.001). Discussion: In obese patients, symptoms of depression were associated with raised CRP levels after controlling for confounding variables. Obese women on estrogen therapy are at risk of high CRP levels.
Language eng
DOI 10.1038/oby.2008.271
Field of Research 179999 Psychology and Cognitive Sciences not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 970117 Expanding Knowledge in Psychology and Cognitive Sciences
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30052362

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Faculty of Health
School of Psychology
Open Access Collection
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.