The impact of specialist training on professional identity, organisational membership, organisational commitment and stress in correctional psychologists

Curtis, Ashlee and Day, Andrew 2013, The impact of specialist training on professional identity, organisational membership, organisational commitment and stress in correctional psychologists, Journal of forensic practice, vol. 15, no. 2, pp. 130-140.

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Title The impact of specialist training on professional identity, organisational membership, organisational commitment and stress in correctional psychologists
Author(s) Curtis, Ashlee
Day, Andrew
Journal name Journal of forensic practice
Volume number 15
Issue number 2
Start page 130
End page 140
Publisher Emerald
Place of publication Bingley, England
Publication date 2013
ISSN 2050-8794
2042-8340
Keyword(s) Forensic psychology
Organisational commitment
Organisational membership
Professional identity
Psychology
Training
Summary Purpose - Recent years have seen some significant changes to the psychology profession in Australia that have prompted debate about the role of specialist areas of practice. This study investigates those attitudes and values that might be associated with one particular specialism, that of forensic psychology.

Design/methodology/approach - The influence of specialist forensic training on the professional identity of thirty correctional psychologists was examined in relation to their self-reported level of stress, organisational membership, and organisational commitment.

Findings - The results suggest that exposure to specialist training in forensic psychology may not be directly associated with organisational commitment, membership or stress, although some differences between forensic psychologists and those who held other professional practice qualifications were observed.

Research limitations/implications - The main limitations of the study include the small sample size and the use of a scale that has not been well-validated. Replication and extension of the study is required.

Practical implications - The study has implications for the recruitment and retention of psychologists in correctional settings and for the development of professional identity in post-graduate training programmes.

Originality/value - This study is the first to explore the differences in professional identity, organisational commitment, organisational membership and stress in a sample of psychologists who practice in the correctional setting.
Language eng
Field of Research 170104 Forensic Psychology
Socio Economic Objective 940408 Rehabilitation and Correctional Services
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2013, Emerald
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30052396

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Psychology
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