You are not logged in.

Application of white-beam X-ray microdiffraction for the study of mineralogical phase identification in ancient Egyptian pigments

Lynch, P.A., Tamura, N., Lau, D., Madsen, I., Liang, D., Strohschnieder, M. and Stevenson, A.W. 2011, Application of white-beam X-ray microdiffraction for the study of mineralogical phase identification in ancient Egyptian pigments, Journal of applied crystallography, vol. 40, no. 6, pp. 1089-1096, doi: 10.1107/S0021889807041003.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads

Title Application of white-beam X-ray microdiffraction for the study of mineralogical phase identification in ancient Egyptian pigments
Author(s) Lynch, P.A.
Tamura, N.
Lau, D.
Madsen, I.
Liang, D.
Strohschnieder, M.
Stevenson, A.W.
Journal name Journal of applied crystallography
Volume number 40
Issue number 6
Start page 1089
End page 1096
Total pages 8
Publisher Wiley
Place of publication Malden, Mass.
Publication date 2011
ISSN 0021-8898
1600-5767
Keyword(s) Laue diffraction
white-beam X-ray microdiffraction
pigments
Summary High-brightness synchrotron X-rays together with precision achromatic focusing optics on beamline 7.3.3 at the Advanced Light Source have been applied for Laue microdiffraction analysis of mineralogical phases in Egyptian pigments. Although this task is usually performed using monochromatic X-ray diffraction, the Laue technique was both faster and more reliable for the present sample. In this approach, white-beam diffraction patterns are collected as the sample is raster scanned across the incident beam (0.8 µm × 0.8 µm). The complex Laue diffraction patterns arising from illumination of multiple grains are indexed using the white-beam crystallographic software package XMAS, enabling a mineralogical map as a function of sample position. This methodology has been applied to determine the mineralogy of colour pigments taken from the ancient Egyptian coffin of Tjeseb, a priestess of the Apis bull dating from the Third Intermediate to Late period, 25th Dynasty to early 26th Dynasty (747 to 600 BC). For all pigments, a ground layer of calcite and quartz was identified. For the blue pigment, cuprorivaite (CuCaSi4O10) was found to be the primary colouring agent with a grain size ranging from ∼10 to 50 µm. In the green and yellow samples, malachite [Cu2(OH)2CO3] and goethite [FeO(OH)] were identified, respectively. Grain sizes from these pigments were significantly smaller. It was possible to index some malachite grains up to ∼20 µm in size, while the majority of goethite grains displayed a nanocrystalline particle size. The inability to obtain a complete mineralogical map for goethite highlights the fact that the incident probe size is considerably larger than the grain size. This limit will continue to improve as the present trend is toward focusing optics approaching the diffraction limit (∼1000× smaller beam area).
Language eng
DOI 10.1107/S0021889807041003
Field of Research 029999 Physical Sciences not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 970102 Expanding Knowledge in the Physical Sciences
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2011, Wiley
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30052451

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: Institute for Frontier Materials
Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 4 times in TR Web of Science
Scopus Citation Count Cited 3 times in Scopus
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 172 Abstract Views, 2 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Mon, 13 May 2013, 12:37:57 EST

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.