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What helps children to be more active and less sedentary? Perceptions of mothers living in disadvantaged neighbourhoods

Veitch, J., Hume, C., Salmon, J., Crawford, D. and Ball, K. 2013, What helps children to be more active and less sedentary? Perceptions of mothers living in disadvantaged neighbourhoods, Child : care, health and development, vol. 39, no. 1, pp. 94-102.

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Title What helps children to be more active and less sedentary? Perceptions of mothers living in disadvantaged neighbourhoods
Author(s) Veitch, J.
Hume, C.
Salmon, J.
Crawford, D.
Ball, K.
Journal name Child : care, health and development
Volume number 39
Issue number 1
Start page 94
End page 102
Total pages 9
Publisher Wiley - Blackwell Publishing
Place of publication Chichester, England
Publication date 2013-01
ISSN 0305-1862
1365-2214
Keyword(s) children
disadvantaged neighbourhoods
physical activity
qualitative interviews
sedentary behaviour
Summary Background Increasing children's participation in physical activity and decreasing time spent in sedentary behaviours is of great importance to public health. Despite living in disadvantaged neighbourhoods, some children manage to engage in health-promoting physical activity and avoid high levels of screen-based activities (i.e. watching TV, computer use and playing electronic games). Understanding how these children manage to do well and whether there are unique features of their home or neighbourhood that explain their success is important for informing strategies targeting less active and more sedentary children. The aim of this qualitative study was to gain in-depth insights from mothers regarding their child's resilience to low physical activity and high screen-time.

Methods Semi-structured face-to-face interviews were conducted with 38 mothers of children who lived in disadvantaged neighbourhoods in urban and rural areas of Victoria, Australia. The interviews were designed to gain in-depth insights about perceived individual, social and physical environmental factors influencing resilience to low physical activity and high screen-time.

Results Themes relating to physical activity that emerged from the interviews included: parental encouragement, support and modelling; sports culture in a rural town; the physical home and neighbourhood environment; child's individual personality; and dog ownership. Themes relating to screen-time behaviours encompassed: parental control; and child's individual preferences.

Conclusions The results offer important insights into potential avenues for developing ‘resilience’ and increasing physical activity and reducing screen-time among children living in disadvantaged neighbourhoods. In light of the negative effects of low physical activity and high levels of screen-time on children's health, this evidence is urgently needed.
Language eng
Field of Research 110699 Human Movement and Sports Science not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 920401 Behaviour and Health
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2013, Wiley
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30052595

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.