Different current intensities of anodal transcranial direct current stimulation do not differentially modulate motor cortex plasticity

Kidgell, Dawson J., Daly, Robin M., Young, Kayleigh, Lum, Jarrod, Tooley, Gregory, Jaberzadeh, Shapour, Zoghi, Maryam and Pearce, Alan J. 2013, Different current intensities of anodal transcranial direct current stimulation do not differentially modulate motor cortex plasticity, Neural plasticity, vol. 2013, Article Id : 603502, pp. 1-9.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads

Title Different current intensities of anodal transcranial direct current stimulation do not differentially modulate motor cortex plasticity
Author(s) Kidgell, Dawson J.
Daly, Robin M.
Young, Kayleigh
Lum, Jarrod
Tooley, Gregory
Jaberzadeh, Shapour
Zoghi, Maryam
Pearce, Alan J.
Journal name Neural plasticity
Volume number 2013
Season Article Id : 603502
Start page 1
End page 9
Total pages 9
Publisher Hindawi Publishing Corporation
Place of publication New York, N.Y.
Publication date 2013
ISSN 2090-5904
Summary Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) is a noninvasive technique that modulates the excitability of neurons within the motor cortex (M1). Although the aftereffects of anodal tDCS on modulating cortical excitability have been described, there is limited data describing the outcomes of different tDCS intensities on intracortical circuits. To further elucidate the mechanisms underlying the aftereffects of M1 excitability following anodal tDCS, we used transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) to examine the effect of different intensities on cortical excitability and short-interval intracortical inhibition (SICI). Using a randomized, counterbalanced, crossover design, with a one-week wash-out period, 14 participants (6 females and 8 males, 22–45 years) were exposed to 10 minutes of anodal tDCS at 0.8, 1.0, and 1.2 mA. TMS was used to measure M1 excitability and SICI of the contralateral wrist extensor muscle at baseline, immediately after and 15 and 30 minutes following cessation of anodal tDCS. Cortical excitability increased, whilst SICI was reduced at all time points following anodal tDCS. Interestingly, there were no differences between the three intensities of anodal tDCS on modulating cortical excitability or SICI. These results suggest that the aftereffect of anodal tDCS on facilitating cortical excitability is due to the modulation of synaptic mechanisms associated with long-term potentiation and is not influenced by different tDCS intensities.
Language eng
Field of Research 110903 Central Nervous System
Socio Economic Objective 970111 Expanding Knowledge in the Medical and Health Sciences
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30052713

Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 0 times in TR Web of Science
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 38 Abstract Views, 1 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Tue, 28 May 2013, 15:11:38 EST by Jane Moschetti

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.