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The impact of statins on psychological wellbeing : a systematic review and meta-analysis

O'Neil, Adrienne, Sanna, Livia, Redlich, Cassie, Sanderson, Kristy, Jacka, Felice, Williams, Lana J, Pasco, Julie A and Berk, Michael 2012, The impact of statins on psychological wellbeing : a systematic review and meta-analysis, BMC medicine, vol. 10, Article Id : 154, pp. 1-9.

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Title The impact of statins on psychological wellbeing : a systematic review and meta-analysis
Author(s) O'Neil, Adrienne
Sanna, Livia
Redlich, Cassie
Sanderson, Kristy
Jacka, Felice
Williams, Lana J
Pasco, Julie A
Berk, Michael
Journal name BMC medicine
Volume number 10
Season Article Id : 154
Start page 1
End page 9
Total pages 9
Publisher BioMed Central
Place of publication London, England
Publication date 2012-12
ISSN 1741-7015
Keyword(s) anti-inflammatory
cytokines
depression
hypercholesterolemia
mood
oxidative
statins
Summary Background : Cholesterol-lowering medications such as statins have anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties, which may be beneficial for treating depression and improving mood. However, evidence regarding their effects remains inconsistent, with some studies reporting links to mood disturbances. We aimed to conduct a meta-analysis to determine the impact of statins on psychological wellbeing of individuals with or without hypercholesterolemia.

Methods :
Articles were identified using medical, health, psychiatric and social science databases, evaluated for quality, and data were synthesized and analyzed in RevMan-5 software using a random effects model.

Results :
The 7 randomized controlled trials included in the analysis represented 2,105 participants. A test for overall effect demonstrated no statistically significant differences in psychological wellbeing between participants receiving statins or a placebo (standardized mean difference (SMD) = -0.08, 95% CI -0.29 to 0.12; P = 0.42). Sensitivity analyses were conducted to separately analyze depression (n = 5) and mood (n = 2) outcomes; statins were associated with statistically significant improvements in mood scores (SMD = -0.43, 95% CI -0.61 to -0.24).

Conclusions :
Our findings refute evidence of negative effects of statins on psychological outcomes, providing some support for mood-related benefits. Future studies could examine the effects of statins in depressed populations.
Notes This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Language eng
Field of Research 119999 Medical and Health Sciences not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 970111 Expanding Knowledge in the Medical and Health Sciences
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2012, BioMed Central
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30052721

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Medicine
Open Access Collection
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.