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Behavior and weight correlates of weight-control efforts in Australian women living in disadvantage : the READI study

Jeffery, Robert W., Abbott, Gavin, Ball, Kylie and Crawford, David 2013, Behavior and weight correlates of weight-control efforts in Australian women living in disadvantage : the READI study, International journal of behavioral nutrition and physical activity, vol. 10, no. 52, pp. 1-14.

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Title Behavior and weight correlates of weight-control efforts in Australian women living in disadvantage : the READI study
Author(s) Jeffery, Robert W.
Abbott, Gavin
Ball, Kylie
Crawford, David
Journal name International journal of behavioral nutrition and physical activity
Volume number 10
Issue number 52
Start page 1
End page 14
Total pages 14
Publisher BioMed Central
Place of publication London, England
Publication date 2013-04-26
ISSN 1479-5868
Keyword(s) intentional
weight-control
food
activity
choice
weight
change
Summary Background
With increasing obesity rates worldwide, more and more people are actively attempting to lose weight or avoid weight gain, but relatively little is known about what specific behaviors comprise these efforts and which, if any, are associated with better weight control over time.

Methods
This paper reports relationships between body weight, weight-control efforts and related behaviors over a three-year period in 1,634 Australian women. The women were purposefully recruited from 80 disadvantaged neighborhoods in Victoria, Australia. Weight loss efforts were categorized as trying to lose weight, trying to prevent weight gain and no weight-control efforts. Behavioral correlates examined included different kinds of physical activity and consumption of a number of specific foods types.

Results and discussion
Self-reported body weight at baseline was higher in women trying to lose weight. Frequency of consumption of low energy density foods was positively associated with reported weight-control efforts, as was frequency of reported total and leisure-time physical activity. Longitudinal associations between changes in weight-control efforts and changes in behaviors were consistent with the cross-sectional findings. At three-year follow up, however, weight-control efforts were not associated with change in body weight. More detailed analyses of specific food choices suggested that part of the explanation of no effect of reported weight-control efforts and weight over time might be that people are not as well-informed as they should be about the energy density of some common foods. In particular, those reporting engagement in weight-control efforts reported reducing consumption of carbohydrate-containing foods such as bread and potatoes more than is justified by their energy content, while they reported increasing consumption of some high energy density foods (e.g., cheese and nuts).

Conclusion
It is tentatively concluded that women living in disadvantaged neighborhoods understand messages about weight-control (more activity and foods with lower fat and lower energy density) but that some foods eaten more by women engaged in weight control may reduce the effectiveness of these efforts.
Notes This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Language eng
Field of Research 111199 Nutrition and Dietetics not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 920401 Behaviour and Health
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2013, Jeffery et al.
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30052729

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Created: Thu, 30 May 2013, 14:53:01 EST by Jane Moschetti

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.