Short-interval intracortical inhibition is not affected by varying visual feedback in an isometric task in biceps brachiii muscle

Rantalainen, Timo, Weier, Ashleigh, Leung, Michael, Brandner, Chris, Spittle, Michael and Kidgell, Dawson 2013, Short-interval intracortical inhibition is not affected by varying visual feedback in an isometric task in biceps brachiii muscle, Frontiers in human neuroscience, vol. 7, Article 68, pp. 1-8.

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Title Short-interval intracortical inhibition is not affected by varying visual feedback in an isometric task in biceps brachiii muscle
Author(s) Rantalainen, Timo
Weier, Ashleigh
Leung, Michael
Brandner, Chris
Spittle, Michael
Kidgell, Dawson
Journal name Frontiers in human neuroscience
Volume number 7
Season Article 68
Start page 1
End page 8
Total pages 8
Publisher Frontiers Research Foundation
Place of publication Lausanne, Switzerland
Publication date 2013-03-08
ISSN 1662-5161
Keyword(s) transcranial magnetic stimulation
primary motor cortex
task specificity
force gradation
motor control
Summary Purpose : To establish if visual feedback and force requirements influence SICI.

Methods : SICI was assessed from 10 healthy adults (5 males and 5 females aged between 21 and 35 years) in three submaximal isometric elbow flexion torque levels [5, 20, and 40% of maximal voluntary contraction (MVC)] and with two tasks differing in terms of visual feedback. Single-pulse and paired-pulse motor-evoked potentials (MEPs), supramaximal M-wave, and background surface electromyogram (sEMG) were recorded from the biceps brachii muscle.

Results : Repeated measures MANOVA was used for statistical analyses. Background sEMG did not differ between tasks (F = 0.4, P = 0.68) nor was task × torque level interaction observed (F = 1.2, P = 0.32), whereas background sEMG increased with increasing torque levels (P = 0.001). SICI did not differ between tasks (F = 0.9, P = 0.43) and no task × torque level interaction was observed (F = 2.3, P = 0.08). However, less SICI was observed at 40% MVC compared to the 5 and 20% MVC torque levels (P = 0.01–0.001).

Conclusion :
SICI was not altered by performing the same task with differing visual feedback. However, SICI decreased with increasing submaximal torque providing further evidence that SICI is one mechanism of modulating cortical excitability and plays a role in force gradation.
Language eng
Field of Research 110903 Central Nervous System
Socio Economic Objective 970111 Expanding Knowledge in the Medical and Health Sciences
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30052732

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: Centre for Physical Activity and Nutrition Research
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