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Aspirin : a review of its neurobiological properties and therapeutic potential for mental illness

Berk, Michael, Dean, Olivia, Drexhage, Hemmo, McNeil, John J., Moylan, Steven, O'Neil, Adrienne, Davey, Christopher G., Sanna, Livia and Maes, Michael 2013, Aspirin : a review of its neurobiological properties and therapeutic potential for mental illness, BMC medicine, vol. 11, Article 74, pp. 1-51.

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Title Aspirin : a review of its neurobiological properties and therapeutic potential for mental illness
Author(s) Berk, Michael
Dean, Olivia
Drexhage, Hemmo
McNeil, John J.
Moylan, Steven
O'Neil, Adrienne
Davey, Christopher G.
Sanna, Livia
Maes, Michael
Journal name BMC medicine
Volume number 11
Season Article 74
Start page 1
End page 51
Total pages 51
Publisher BioMed Central
Place of publication London, England
Publication date 2013
ISSN 1741-7015
Summary There is compelling evidence to support an aetiological role for inflammation, oxidative and nitrosative stress (O&NS), and mitochondrial dysfunction in the pathophysiology of major neuropsychiatric disorders, including depression, schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and Alzheimer's disease (AD). These may represent new pathways for therapy. Aspirin is a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug that is an irreversible inhibitor of both cyclooxygenase (COX)-1 and COX-2, It stimulates endogenous production of anti-inflammatory regulatory 'braking signals', including lipoxins, which dampen the inflammatory response and reduce levels of inflammatory biomarkers, including C-reactive protein, tumor necrosis factor- and interleukin (IL)--6 , but not negative immunoregulatory cytokines, such as IL-4 and IL-10. Aspirin can reduce oxidative stress and protect against oxidative damage. Early evidence suggests there are beneficial effects of aspirin in preclinical and clinical studies in mood disorders and schizophrenia, and epidemiological data suggests that high-dose aspirin is associated with a reduced risk of AD. Aspirin, one of the oldest agents in medicine, is a potential new therapy for a range of neuropsychiatric disorders, and may provide proof-of-principle support for the role of inflammation and O&NS in the pathophysiology of this diverse group of disorders.
Language eng
Field of Research 119999 Medical and Health Sciences not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 970111 Expanding Knowledge in the Medical and Health Sciences
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2013, BioMed Central
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30052827

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Medicine
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Created: Tue, 04 Jun 2013, 14:37:34 EST by Jane Moschetti

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.