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Consumption of a low glycaemic index diet in late life extends lifespan of Balb/c mice with differential effects on DNA damage

Nankervis, Scott A., Mitchell, Jenee M., Charchar, Fadi J., McGlynn, Maree A. and Lewandowski, Paul A. 2013, Consumption of a low glycaemic index diet in late life extends lifespan of Balb/c mice with differential effects on DNA damage, Longevity and healthspan, vol. 2, no. 4, pp. 1-13.

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Title Consumption of a low glycaemic index diet in late life extends lifespan of Balb/c mice with differential effects on DNA damage
Author(s) Nankervis, Scott A.
Mitchell, Jenee M.
Charchar, Fadi J.
McGlynn, Maree A.
Lewandowski, Paul A.
Journal name Longevity and healthspan
Volume number 2
Issue number 4
Start page 1
End page 13
Total pages 13
Publisher BioMed Central
Place of publication London, England
Publication date 2013
ISSN 2046-2395
Summary Background : Caloric restriction is known to extend the lifespan of all organisms in which it has been tested. Consequently, current research is investigating the role of various foods to improve health and lifespan. The role of various diets has received less attention however, and in some cases may have more capacity to improve health and longevity than specific foods alone. We examined the benefits to longevity of a low glycaemic index (GI) diet in aged Balb/c mice and examined markers of oxidative stress and subsequent effects on telomere dynamics.

Results :
In an aged population of mice, a low GI diet extended average lifespan by 12%, improved glucose tolerance and had impressive effects on amelioration of oxidative damage to DNA in white blood cells. Telomere length in quadriceps muscle showed no improvement in the dieted group, nor was telomerase reactivated.

Conclusion : The beneficial effects of a low GI diet are evident from the current study and although the impact to telomere dynamics late in life is minimal, we expect that earlier intervention with a low GI diet would provide significant improvement in health and longevity with associated effects to telomere homeostasis.
Notes This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Language eng
Field of Research 111103 Nutritional Physiology
Socio Economic Objective 920411 Nutrition
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2013, The Authors
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30052873

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Medicine
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Created: Thu, 06 Jun 2013, 12:46:06 EST by Paul Lewandowski

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.