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Assessing blinding in clinical trials

Arandjelovic, Ognjen 2012, Assessing blinding in clinical trials, in NIPS 2012 : Advances in neural information processing systems : proceedings of the 26th Annual Conference on Neural Information Processing Systems, Curran Associates Inc., Red Hook, N. Y., pp. 521-529.

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Title Assessing blinding in clinical trials
Author(s) Arandjelovic, Ognjen
Conference name Neural Information Processing Systems. Conference (26th : 2012 : Lake Tahoe, Nev.)
Conference location Lake Tahoe, Nev.
Conference dates 3-6 Dec. 2012
Title of proceedings NIPS 2012 : Advances in neural information processing systems : proceedings of the 26th Annual Conference on Neural Information Processing Systems
Editor(s) Bartlett, P.
Pereira, F. C. N.
Burges, C. J. C.
Bottou, L.
Weinberger, K. Q.
Publication date 2012
Series Neural information processing systems : annual conference
Conference series Neural Information Processing Systems. Conference
Start page 521
End page 529
Total pages 9
Publisher Curran Associates Inc.
Place of publication Red Hook, N. Y.
Keyword(s) intervention
clinical trials
blinding measures
questionnaire
Summary The interaction between the patient's expected outcome of an intervention and the inherent effects of that intervention can have extraordinary effects. Thus in clinical trials an effort is made to conceal the nature of the administered intervention from the participants in the trial i.e. to blind it. Yet, in practice perfect blinding is impossible to ensure or even verify. The current standard is follow up the trial with an auxiliary questionnaire, which allows trial participants to express their belief concerning the assigned intervention and which is used to compute a measure of the extent of blinding in the trial. If the estimated extent of blinding exceeds a threshold the trial is deemed sufficiently blinded; otherwise, the trial is deemed to have failed. In this paper we make several important contributions. Firstly, we identify a series of fundamental problems of the aforesaid practice and discuss them in context of the most commonly used blinding measures. Secondly, motivated by the highlighted problems, we formulate a novel method for handling imperfectly blinded trials. We too adopt a post-trial feedback questionnaire but interpret the collected data using an original approach, fundamentally different from those previously proposed. Unlike previous approaches, ours is void of any ad hoc free parameters, is robust to small changes in auxiliary data and is not predicated on any strong assumptions used to interpret participants' feedback.
ISBN 9781627480031
ISSN 1049-5258
Language eng
Field of Research 010401 Applied Statistics
010402 Biostatistics
080109 Pattern Recognition and Data Mining
Socio Economic Objective 920204 Evaluation of Health Outcomes
HERDC Research category E1 Full written paper - refereed
Copyright notice ©2012, Curran Associates
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30052877

Document type: Conference Paper
Collections: Centre for Pattern Recognition and Data Analytics
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.