Quantification of tackling demands in professional Australian football using integrated wearable athlete tracking technology

Gastin, Paul B., McLean, Owen, Spittle, Michael and Breed, Ray V. P. 2013, Quantification of tackling demands in professional Australian football using integrated wearable athlete tracking technology, Journal of science and medicine in sport, vol. 16, no. 6, pp. 589-593.

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Title Quantification of tackling demands in professional Australian football using integrated wearable athlete tracking technology
Author(s) Gastin, Paul B.
McLean, Owen
Spittle, Michael
Breed, Ray V. P.
Journal name Journal of science and medicine in sport
Volume number 16
Issue number 6
Start page 589
End page 593
Total pages 5
Publisher Elsevier Australia
Place of publication Chatswood , N. S. W.
Publication date 2013
ISSN 1878-1861
1440-2440
Keyword(s) acceleration
collision
GPS
impact force
player load
Summary Objectives
To describe and quantify the frequency, velocity and acceleration at impact during tackling in Australian football using a combination of video and athlete tracking technology.

Design
Quasi-experimental.

Methods
Data was collected from twenty professional Australian Football League players during four in-season matches. All tackles made by the player and those against the player were video-coded and time stamped at the point of contact and then subjectively categorised into low, medium and high intensity impact groups. Peak GPS and acceleration data were identified at the point of contact. Two-way analysis of variance was used to assess differences (p < 0.05) between tackle type (made and against) and tackle intensity.

Results
A total of 173 tackles made and 179 tackles against were recorded. Significant differences were found between all tackle intensity groups. Peak velocity was significantly greater in high (19.5 ± 6.1 km h−1) compared to medium (13.4 ± 5.8 km h−1) and low intensity (11.3 ± 5.0 km h−1) tackles. Peak Player Load™, a modified vector magnitude of tri-axial acceleration, was significantly greater in high (7.5 ± 1.7 a.u.) compared to medium (4.9 ± 1.5 a.u.) and low intensity (4.0 ± 1.3 a.u.) tackles.

Conclusions
High intensity tackles, although less frequent, are significantly greater in speed of movement immediately prior to contact and in the resultant impact acceleration compared to tackles of lower intensity. Differences in accelerometer data between tackles observed to be progressively greater in intensity suggest a level of ecological validity and provide preliminary support for the use of accelerometers to assess impact forces in contact invasion sports.
Language eng
Field of Research 110699 Human Movement and Sports Science not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 970111 Expanding Knowledge in the Medical and Health Sciences
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30053482

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