Fictional inquiry : an alternative process to inspire creativity in children's co-design projects

Xu, Leilei and Wong, Alastair Qin Wen 2013, Fictional inquiry : an alternative process to inspire creativity in children's co-design projects, in Cultural ecology : new approaches to culture, architecture and ecology, School of Architecture + Built Environment, Deakin University, Geelong, Vic., pp. 124-133.

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Title Fictional inquiry : an alternative process to inspire creativity in children's co-design projects
Author(s) Xu, Leilei
Wong, Alastair Qin Wen
Conference name Cultural Ecology. Symposium (2012 : Geelong, Victoria)
Conference location Geelong, Victoria
Conference dates 23-24 Oct. 2012
Title of proceedings Cultural ecology : new approaches to culture, architecture and ecology
Editor(s) Lozanovska, Mirjana
Publication date 2013
Conference series Cultural Ecology Symposium
Start page 124
End page 133
Total pages 10
Publisher School of Architecture + Built Environment, Deakin University
Place of publication Geelong, Vic.
Keyword(s) Children creativity
fictional enquiry
co-design
architecture
Summary Children's creativity is a valuable resource for architectural design, and attempts have been made throughout the world to involve children in the design process of their environments. Previous children's co-design projects often followed a problem solving process, however, this process has limitations in stimulating children's creativity. Research has found that children's creativity is different to adult's creativity: Instead of creative problem solving skills, children's creativity is most evident in their imagination and originality of thinking. Addressing this issue, an alternative process in children's co-design projects was experimented: Fictional Inquiry. In this paper, two case studies are used to illustrate how the fictional inquiry process is applied in children's co-design projects.* These two projects were both joint educational projects between Deakin University and schools in Geelong and Melbourne. Through several weeks' of workshops, children and university architecture students worked in small groups to develop architectural design solutions. It was observed that creative design outcomes have been achieved in these two projects, which suggested that Fictional Inquiry was an effective process to inspire children's creativity. Applying the Fictional Inquiry process, Deakin University is currently working with another school in the Geelong Region, with the aim of achieving creative architectural design outcomes.
Language eng
Field of Research 129999 Built Environment and Design not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 970112 Expanding Knowledge in Built Environment and Design
HERDC Research category E1 Full written paper - refereed
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30053586

Document type: Conference Paper
Collection: School of Architecture and Built Environment
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