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Perceived benefits and barriers to exercise for recently treated patients with multiple myeloma: a qualitative study

Craike, Melinda J., Hose, Kaye, Courneya, Kerry S., Harrison, Simon J. and Livingston, Patricia M. 2013, Perceived benefits and barriers to exercise for recently treated patients with multiple myeloma: a qualitative study, BMC cancer, vol. 13, pp. 1-10, doi: 10.1186/1471-2407-13-319.

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Title Perceived benefits and barriers to exercise for recently treated patients with multiple myeloma: a qualitative study
Author(s) Craike, Melinda J.
Hose, Kaye
Courneya, Kerry S.
Harrison, Simon J.
Livingston, Patricia M.
Journal name BMC cancer
Volume number 13
Start page 1
End page 10
Total pages 10
Publisher BioMed Central
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2013
ISSN 1471-2407
Keyword(s) cancer
oncology
multiple myeloma
physical activity
exercise
Summary Abstract
Background: Understanding the physical activity experiences of patients with multiple myeloma (MM) is essential to inform the development of evidence-based interventions and to quantify the benefits of physical activity. The aim of this study was to gain an in-depth understanding of the physical activity experiences and perceived benefits and barriers to physical activity for patients with MM.
Methods: This was a qualitative study that used a grounded theory approach. Semi-structured interviews were conducted in Victoria, Australia by telephone from December 2011-February 2012 with patients who had been treated for MM within the preceding 2 – 12 months. Interviews were transcribed and analysed using the constant comparison coding method to reduce the data to themes. Gender differences and differences between treatment groups were explored.
Results: Twenty-four interviews were completed. The sample comprised 13 females (54%), with a mean age of 62 years (SD = 8.8). Sixteen (67%) participants had received an autologous stem cell transplant (ASCT). All participants currently engaged in a range of light to moderate intensity physical activity; walking and gardening were the most common activities. Recovery from the symptoms of MM and side effects of therapy, psychological benefits, social factors and enjoyment were important benefits of physical activity. Barriers to physical activity predominately related to the symptoms of MM and side effects of therapy, including pain, fatigue, and fear of infection. Low self- motivation was also a barrier. Women participated in a more diverse range of physical activities than men and there were gender differences in preferred type of physical activity. Women were more likely to report psychological and social benefits; whereas men reported physical activity as a way to keep busy and self- motivation was a barrier. Patients treated with an ASCT more often reported affective benefits of participation in physical activity and fatigue as a barrier. Patients treated with other therapies (e.g., chemotherapy, radiotherapy) were more likely to report pain as a barrier.
Conclusions: Patients with MM experience debilitating effects of their condition and therapy, which influences their level and intensity of physical activity participation. Physical activity programs should be individualised; take into consideration gender differences and the impact of different types of therapy on physical activity; and focus on meeting the psychological, coping and recovery needs of patients.
Language eng
DOI 10.1186/1471-2407-13-319
Field of Research 111712 Health Promotion
Socio Economic Objective 920401 Behaviour and Health
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2013, BioMed Central
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30053668

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Faculty of Health
School of Nursing and Midwifery
Open Access Collection
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Created: Fri, 12 Jul 2013, 16:53:24 EST by Barb Lavelle

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.