Classification of main meal patterns - a latent class approach

Wang, Wei C., Worsley, Anthony and Hodgson, Victoria 2013, Classification of main meal patterns - a latent class approach, British journal of nutrition, vol. 109, no. 12, pp. 2285-2296.

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Title Classification of main meal patterns - a latent class approach
Author(s) Wang, Wei C.
Worsley, Anthony
Hodgson, Victoria
Journal name British journal of nutrition
Volume number 109
Issue number 12
Start page 2285
End page 2296
Total pages 12
Publisher Cambridge University
Place of publication Cambridge, England
Publication date 2013-06-28
ISSN 0007-1145
Keyword(s) main meal dishes
demographics
food knowledge
personal values
latent class analysis
surveys
Australia
Summary Relatively little examination of the meals that are prepared in households has been conducted, despite their well-defined properties and widespread community interest in their preparation. The purpose of the present study was to identify the patterns of main meal preparation among Australian adult household meal preparers aged 44 years and younger and 45 years and over, and the relationships between these patterns and likely socio-demographic and psychological predictors. An online cross-sectional survey was conducted by Meat and Livestock Australia among a representative sample of people aged 18–65 years in Australia in 2011. A total of 1076 usable questionnaires were obtained, which included categorical information about the main meal dishes that participants had prepared during the previous 6 months along with demographic information, the presence or absence of children at home, confidence in seasonal food knowledge and personal values. Latent class analysis was applied and four types of usage patterns of thirty-three popular dishes were identified for both age groups, namely, high variety, moderate variety, high protein but low beef and low variety. The meal patterns were associated differentially with the covariates between the age groups. For example, younger women were more likely to prepare a high or moderate variety of meals than younger men, while younger people who had higher levels of education were more likely to prepare high-protein but low-beef meals. Moreover, young respondents with higher BMI were less likely to prepare meals with high protein but low beef content. Among the older age group, married people were more likely to prepare a high or moderate variety of meals than people without partners. Older people who held strong universalist values were more likely to prepare a wide variety of meals with high protein but low beef content. For both age groups, people who had children living at home and those with better seasonal food knowledge were more likely to prepare a high variety of dishes. The identification of classes of meal users would enable health communication to be tailored to improve meal patterns. Moreover, the concept of meals may be useful for health promotion, because people may find it easier to change their consumption of meals rather than individual foods.
Language eng
Field of Research 111199 Nutrition and Dietetics not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 920411 Nutrition
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30053674

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences
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