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Developing targeted health service interventions using the PRECEDE-PROCEED model: two Australian case studies

Phillips, Jane L., Rolley, John X. and Davidson, Patricia M. 2012, Developing targeted health service interventions using the PRECEDE-PROCEED model: two Australian case studies, Nursing research and practice, vol. 2012, pp. 1-8, doi: 10.1155/2012/279431.

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Title Developing targeted health service interventions using the PRECEDE-PROCEED model: two Australian case studies
Author(s) Phillips, Jane L.
Rolley, John X.
Davidson, Patricia M.
Journal name Nursing research and practice
Volume number 2012
Article ID 279431
Start page 1
End page 8
Total pages 8
Publisher Hindawi Publishing Corporation
Place of publication New York, N. Y.
Publication date 2012
ISSN 2090-1429
2090-1437
Summary  This paper provides an overview of the applicability of the PRECEDE-PROCEED Model to the development of targeted nursing led chronic illness interventions. Background. Changing health care practice is a complex and dynamic process that requires consideration of social, political, economic, and organisational factors. An understanding of the characteristics of the target population, health professionals, and organizations plus identification of the determinants for change are also required. Synthesizing this data to guide the development of an effective intervention is a challenging process. The PRECEDE-PROCEED Model has been used in global health care settings to guide the identification, planning, implementation, and evaluation of various health improvement initiatives. Design. Using a reflective case study approach, this paper examines the applicability of the PRECEDE-PROCEED Model to the development of targeted chronic care improvement interventions for two distinct Australian populations: a rapidly expanding and aging rural population with unmet palliative care needs and a disadvantaged urban community at higher risk of cardiovascular disease. Results. The PRECEDE-PROCEED Model approach demonstrated utility across diverse health settings in a systematic planning process. In environments characterized by increasing health care needs, limited resources, and growing community expectations, adopting planning tools such as PRECEDE-PROCEED Model at a local level can facilitate the development of the most effective interventions. Relevance to Clinical Practice. The PRECEDE-PROCEED Model is a strong theoretical model that guides the development of realistic nursing led interventions with the best chance of being successful in existing health care environments.
Language eng
DOI 10.1155/2012/279431
Field of Research 119999 Medical and Health Sciences not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 970111 Expanding Knowledge in the Medical and Health Sciences
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2012, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30054521

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Nursing and Midwifery
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.