You are not logged in.
Openly accessible

Dose-dependent effects of docosahexaenoic acid-rich fish oil on erythrocyte docosahexaenoic acid and blood lipid levels

Milte, Catherine M., Coates, Alison M., Buckley, Jonathon D., Hill, Alison M. and Howe, Peter R.C. 2008, Dose-dependent effects of docosahexaenoic acid-rich fish oil on erythrocyte docosahexaenoic acid and blood lipid levels, British journal of nutrition : an international journal of nutritional science, vol. 99, no. 5, pp. 1083-1088, doi: 10.1017/S000711450785344X.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
milte-dosedependenteffects-2008.pdf Published version application/pdf 147.66KB 79

Title Dose-dependent effects of docosahexaenoic acid-rich fish oil on erythrocyte docosahexaenoic acid and blood lipid levels
Author(s) Milte, Catherine M.ORCID iD for Milte, Catherine M. orcid.org/0000-0003-0035-6405
Coates, Alison M.
Buckley, Jonathon D.
Hill, Alison M.
Howe, Peter R.C.
Journal name British journal of nutrition : an international journal of nutritional science
Volume number 99
Issue number 5
Start page 1083
End page 1088
Total pages 6
Publisher Cambridge University Press
Place of publication Cambridge, England
Publication date 2008-05
ISSN 0007-1145
1475-2662
Keyword(s) lipids
docosahexaenoic acid
n-3 PUFA
Summary Consumption of long-chain n-3 PUFA, particularly DHA, has been shown to improve cardiovascular risk factors but the intake required to achieve benefits is unclear. We sought to determine the relationship between DHA intake, increases in erythrocyte DHA content and changes in blood lipids. A total of sixty-seven subjects (thirty-six male, thirty-one female, mean age 53 years) with fasting serum TAG ≥ 1·1 mmol/l and BMI>25 kg/m2 completed a 12-week, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled parallel intervention. Subjects consumed 2, 4 or 6 g/d of DHA-rich fish oil (26 % DHA, 6 % EPA) or a placebo (Sunola oil). Fasting blood lipid concentrations and fatty acid profiles in erythrocyte membranes were assessed at baseline and after 6 and 12 weeks. For every 1 g/d increase in DHA intake, there was a 23 % reduction in TAG (mean baseline concentration 1·9 (sem 0·1) mmol/l), 4·4 % increase in HDL-cholesterol and 7·1 % increase in LDL-cholesterol. Erythrocyte DHA content increased in proportion to the dose of DHA consumed (r 0·72, P < 0·001) and the increase after 12 weeks was linearly related to reductions in TAG (r − 0·38, P < 0·01) and increases in total cholesterol (r 0·39, P < 0·01), LDL-cholesterol (r 0·33, P < 0·01) and HDL-cholesterol (r 0·30, P = 0·02). The close association between incorporation of DHA in erythrocytes and its effects on serum lipids highlights the importance of erythrocyte DHA as an indicator of cardiovascular health status.
Language eng
DOI 10.1017/S000711450785344X
Field of Research 119999 Medical and Health Sciences not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 970111 Expanding Knowledge in the Medical and Health Sciences
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2008, Cambridge University Press
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30054594

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences
Open Access Collection
Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 31 times in TR Web of Science
Scopus Citation Count Cited 33 times in Scopus
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 216 Abstract Views, 79 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Thu, 25 Jul 2013, 15:22:32 EST

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.