You are not logged in.
Openly accessible

Rural living and health-related quality of life in Australians with Parkinson's disease

Soh, S-E., McGinley, J.L., Watts, J.J., Iansek, R. and Morris, M.E. 2012, Rural living and health-related quality of life in Australians with Parkinson's disease, Rural and remote health, vol. 12, Article No. 2158, pp. 1-9.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
watts-ruralliving-2012.pdf Published version application/pdf 201.89KB 60

Title Rural living and health-related quality of life in Australians with Parkinson's disease
Author(s) Soh, S-E.
McGinley, J.L.
Watts, J.J.ORCID iD for Watts, J.J. orcid.org/0000-0001-8095-8638
Iansek, R.
Morris, M.E.
Journal name Rural and remote health
Volume number 12
Season Article No. 2158
Start page 1
End page 9
Total pages 9
Publisher Australian Rural Health Education Network
Place of publication Deakin West, A.C.T.
Publication date 2012
ISSN 1445-6354
Keyword(s) Australia
Parkinson’s disease
Parkinson’s disease questionnaire-39
quality of life
rural communities
Summary Introduction: The motor and non-motor symptoms associated with idiopathic Parkinson’s disease (PD) may compromise the health-related quality of life (HRQOL) of some individuals living with this debilitating condition. Although growing evidence suggests that PD may be more prevalent in rural communities, there is little information about the life quality of these individuals. This study examines whether HRQOL ratings vary in relation to rural and metropolitan life settings.
Methods: An analytic cross-sectional study was conducted to compare the HRQOL of two separate samples of people with PD living in metropolitan Melbourne and rural Victoria. The metropolitan sample consisted of 210 individuals who had participated in the baseline assessment for an existing clinical trial. The rural sample comprised 24 participants who attended community-based rehabilitation programs and support groups in rural Victoria. Health-related quality of life was quantified using the Parkinson’s Disease Questionnaire-39 (PDQ-39).
Results:
The HRQOL of participants in rural Australia differed from individuals living in a large metropolitan city (p=0.025). Participants in rural Australia reported worse overall HRQOL, after controlling for differences in disease duration. Their overall HRQOL was lower than for city dwellers. Rural living was also found to be a significant negative predictor of HRQOL (β=0.14; 95% CI -1.27 to -0.08; p=0.027).
Conclusion:
The findings of this study suggest that some people with PD living in rural Victoria perceive their HRQOL to be relatively poor. In order to minimise the debilitating consequences of this disease, further studies examining the factors that may contribute to the HRQOL of individuals living in rural and remote areas are required.
Language eng
Field of Research 119999 Medical and Health Sciences not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 970111 Expanding Knowledge in the Medical and Health Sciences
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2012, Australian Rural Health Education Network
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30054599

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Health and Social Development
Open Access Collection
Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 4 times in TR Web of Science
Scopus Citation Count Cited 3 times in Scopus
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 232 Abstract Views, 60 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Thu, 25 Jul 2013, 15:23:19 EST

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.