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A study protocol of a randomised controlled trial incorporating a health economic analysis to investigate if additional allied health services for rehabilitation reduce length of stay without compromising patient outcomes

Taylor, Nicholas F., Brusco, Natasha K., Watts, Jennifer J., Shields, Nora, Peiris, Casey, Sullivan, Natalie, Kennedy, Genevieve, Cheng, Kwong Teo, Farley, Allison, Lockwood, Kylee and Radia-George, Camilla 2010, A study protocol of a randomised controlled trial incorporating a health economic analysis to investigate if additional allied health services for rehabilitation reduce length of stay without compromising patient outcomes, BMC health services research, vol. 10, Article number 308, pp. 1-7, doi: 10.1186/1472-6963-10-308.

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Title A study protocol of a randomised controlled trial incorporating a health economic analysis to investigate if additional allied health services for rehabilitation reduce length of stay without compromising patient outcomes
Author(s) Taylor, Nicholas F.
Brusco, Natasha K.
Watts, Jennifer J.ORCID iD for Watts, Jennifer J. orcid.org/0000-0001-8095-8638
Shields, Nora
Peiris, Casey
Sullivan, Natalie
Kennedy, Genevieve
Cheng, Kwong Teo
Farley, Allison
Lockwood, Kylee
Radia-George, Camilla
Journal name BMC health services research
Volume number 10
Season Article number 308
Start page 1
End page 7
Total pages 7
Publisher BioMed Central
Place of publication London, England
Publication date 2010
ISSN 1472-6963
Keyword(s) controlled trial
health economic analysis
allied health services
rehabilitation
Summary Background
Reducing patient length of stay is a high priority for health service providers. Preliminary information suggests additional Saturday rehabilitation services could reduce the time a patient stays in hospital by three days. This large trial will examine if providing additional physiotherapy and occupational therapy services on a Saturday reduces health care costs, and improves the health of hospital inpatients receiving rehabilitation compared to the usual Monday to Friday service. We will also investigate the cost effectiveness and patient outcomes of such a service.
Methods/Design A randomised controlled trial will evaluate the effect of providing additional physiotherapy and occupational therapy for rehabilitation. Seven hundred and twelve patients receiving inpatient rehabilitation at two metropolitan sites will be randomly allocated to the intervention group or control group. The control group will receive usual care physiotherapy and occupational therapy from Monday to Friday while the intervention group will receive the same amount of rehabilitation as the control group Monday to Friday plus a full physiotherapy and occupational therapy service on Saturday. The primary outcomes will be patient length of stay, quality of life (EuroQol questionnaire), the Functional Independence Measure (FIM), and health utilization and cost data. Secondary outcomes will assess clinical outcomes relevant to the goals of therapy: the 10 metre walk test, the timed up and go test, the Personal Care Participation Assessment and Resource Tool (PC PART), and the modified motor assessment scale. Blinded assessors will assess outcomes at admission and discharge, and follow up data on quality of life, function and health care costs will be collected at 6 and 12 months after discharge. Between group differences will be analysed with analysis of covariance using baseline measures as the covariate. A health economic analysis will be carried out alongside the randomised controlled trial.
Discussion This paper outlines the study protocol for the first fully powered randomised controlled trial incorporating a health economic analysis to establish if additional Saturday allied health services for rehabilitation inpatients reduces length of stay without compromising discharge outcomes. If successful, this trial will have substantial health benefits for the patients and for organizations delivering rehabilitation services.
Language eng
DOI 10.1186/1472-6963-10-308
Field of Research 119999 Medical and Health Sciences not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 970111 Expanding Knowledge in the Medical and Health Sciences
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2010, BioMed Central
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30054606

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Health and Social Development
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.