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Loss and grief in the workplace. What can we learn from the literature?

O'Connor, Margaret, Watts, Jennifer, Bloomer, Melissa and Larkins, Kevin 2010, Loss and grief in the workplace. What can we learn from the literature?, International journal of workplace health management, vol. 3, no. 2, pp. 131-142, doi: 10.1108/17538351011055023.

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Title Loss and grief in the workplace. What can we learn from the literature?
Author(s) O'Connor, Margaret
Watts, JenniferORCID iD for Watts, Jennifer orcid.org/0000-0001-8095-8638
Bloomer, MelissaORCID iD for Bloomer, Melissa orcid.org/0000-0003-1170-3951
Larkins, Kevin
Journal name International journal of workplace health management
Volume number 3
Issue number 2
Start page 131
End page 142
Total pages 12
Publisher Emerald Group Publishing
Place of publication Bingley, England
Publication date 2010
ISSN 1753-8351
1753-836X
Keyword(s) Australia
business policy
death
interpersonal relations
quality of life
workplace
Summary Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to determine how Australian workplaces, their managers and employees respond to those who are grieving at work, as a result of chronic or terminal illness, or caring for those with chronic or terminal illness. The review draws on Australian and relevant international literature and seeks to answer this question.
Design/methodology/approach – A literature review was undertaken in preparation for an Australian study examining workplace supports for people who are grieving – because they are carers, have experienced a death, or are balancing their own illness with their work. Using a range of search terms, the literature was searched for relevant work between 1980 and 2010. The search found examples of workplace supports throughout the world and some developing Australian literature.
Findings – Despite illness and death occurring at any stage of a person's life, there is little research that identifies workplace issues associated with grief and loss. And while workplace legislation allows for minimal supports, there was evidence that some workplaces have begun to offer flexibility for work life balance.
Practical implications – Effective workplace supports will involve individual and workplace responses, but also require legislative approaches in order to effect broad-based system change.
Originality/value –
The paper compares Australian and international literature about workplace supports and provides an overview of the issues arising.
Notes Reproduced with the kind permission of the copyright owner.
Language eng
DOI 10.1108/17538351011055023
Field of Research 119999 Medical and Health Sciences not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 970111 Expanding Knowledge in the Medical and Health Sciences
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2010, Emerald Group Publishing
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30054607

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Health and Social Development
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.