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Using social network analysis to identify key child care center staff for obesity prevention interventions: a pilot study

Marks, Jennifer, Barnett, Lisa M, Foulkes, Chad, Hawe, Penelope and Allender, Steven 2013, Using social network analysis to identify key child care center staff for obesity prevention interventions: a pilot study, Journal of obesity, vol. 2013, pp. 1-9.

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Title Using social network analysis to identify key child care center staff for obesity prevention interventions: a pilot study
Author(s) Marks, Jennifer
Barnett, Lisa M
Foulkes, Chad
Hawe, Penelope
Allender, Steven
Journal name Journal of obesity
Volume number 2013
Start page 1
End page 9
Total pages 9
Publisher Hindawi Publishing Corp
Place of publication New York, N.Y.
Publication date 2013
ISSN 2090-0708
Summary Introduction. Interest has grown in how systems thinking could be used in obesity prevention. Relationships between key actors, represented by social networks, are an important focus for considering intervention in systems. Method. Two long day care centers were selected in which previous obesity prevention programs had been implemented. Measures showed ways in which physical activity and dietary policy are conversations and actions transacted through social networks (interrelationships) within centers, via an eight item closed-ended social network questionnaire. Questionnaire data were collected from (17/20; response rate 85%) long day care center staff. Social network density and centrality statistics were calculated, using UCINET social network software, to examine the role of networks in obesity prevention. Results. “Degree” (influence) and “betweeness” (gatekeeper) centrality measures of staff inter-relationships about physical activity, dietary, and policy information identified key players in each center. Network density was similar and high on some relationship networks in both centers but markedly different in others, suggesting that the network tool identified unique center social dynamics. These differences could potentially be the focus of future team capacity building. Conclusion. Social network analysis is a feasible and useful method to identify existing obesity prevention networks and key personnel in long day care centers.
Language eng
Field of Research 111704 Community Child Health
Socio Economic Objective 920501 Child Health
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2013, The Authors
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30054872

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Health and Social Development
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.