Transition to practice in supercomplex environments: are occupational therapy graduates adequately prepared?

Fortune, Tracy, Ryan, Susan and Adamson, Lynne 2013, Transition to practice in supercomplex environments: are occupational therapy graduates adequately prepared?, Australian occupational therapy journal, vol. 60, no. 3, pp. 217-220.

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Title Transition to practice in supercomplex environments: are occupational therapy graduates adequately prepared?
Author(s) Fortune, Tracy
Ryan, Susan
Adamson, Lynne
Journal name Australian occupational therapy journal
Volume number 60
Issue number 3
Start page 217
End page 220
Total pages 4
Publisher Wiley - Blackwell Publishing
Place of publication Melbourne, Vic.
Publication date 2013-06
ISSN 0045-0766
1440-1630
Keyword(s) agency
occupational therapy education
political skill
transition-to-practice
Summary The authors of this viewpoint initially came together as colleagues to debate whether occupational therapy curricula (the programmes that each author teaches into) prepared students to not only survive but thrive within the increasingly complex or supercomplex world of professional practice (Barnett, 2011). Through reflective conversations on our collective experiences working with students at capstone (transition-to-practice) level, coupled with further exploration of literature surrounding graduate attributes, employability and professional issues within occupational therapy practice our attention focussed on capacities of agency and political skill, and specifically, the extent to which our graduates are explicitly or implicitly prepared to be agentic and politically adept in practice. In the context of this viewpoint, we refer to agency as an intentional motivation to work toward strategic goals (both personal and organisational). As a construct, Ferris et al. (2007) propose that political skill is comprised of four critical dimensions: social astuteness; interpersonal influence; networking ability and apparent sincerity. Early professional success in most contemporary workplaces we argue, as have others (e.g. Pollard, Sakellariou & Kronenburg, 2008), relate to graduates’ political adeptness.
Language eng
Field of Research 119999 Medical and Health Sciences not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 970113 Expanding Knowledge in Education
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30054937

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Health and Social Development
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Created: Wed, 14 Aug 2013, 14:02:50 EST by Lynne Adamson

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