Downstream spawning migration by the amphidromous Australian grayling (Prototroctes maraena) in a coastal river in south-eastern Australia

Koster, W.M., Dawson, D.R. and Crook, D.A. 2013, Downstream spawning migration by the amphidromous Australian grayling (Prototroctes maraena) in a coastal river in south-eastern Australia, Marine and freshwater research, vol. 64, no. 1, pp. 31-41.

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Title Downstream spawning migration by the amphidromous Australian grayling (Prototroctes maraena) in a coastal river in south-eastern Australia
Author(s) Koster, W.M.
Dawson, D.R.
Crook, D.A.
Journal name Marine and freshwater research
Volume number 64
Issue number 1
Start page 31
End page 41
Total pages 11
Publisher CSIRO Publishing
Place of publication Melbourne, Vic.
Publication date 2013
ISSN 1323-1650
1448-6059
Keyword(s) amphidromy
environmental flows
reproduction
retropinnidae
telemetry
Summary Understanding the reasons and cues for migration is crucial for developing effective conservation and management strategies of diadromous fishes. Spawning and movement patterns of the threatened diadromous Australian grayling (Prototroctes maraena) were investigated in the Bunyip River, Victoria, using drift sampling (2008–2011) and acoustic telemetry (2009–2010) during the autumn–winter spawning period of each year. Fifty-five adult fish (2009: n = 21; 2010: n = 34) were tagged and released in February ~15–30 km upstream of the Bunyip River estuary. Thirteen fish (2009: n = 7; 2010: n = 6) undertook rapid downstream migrations from March to April to reaches immediately upstream of the estuary. Drifting eggs were detected at multiple sites between April and July; however, the majority (78.8%) were collected in the lower reaches within ~0.5 km of the estuary in early–mid-May. Tagged adult fish arrived in this area 1–4 weeks before eggs were detected and usually moved back upstream within 2 weeks following the peak egg abundance. Downstream migration and peak egg abundance were associated with increased river flows. Although the proportion of fish that undertook migrations was low, low rates of tag retention in this species likely account for the failure to detect migration by many of the tagged individuals.
Language eng
Field of Research 070402 Aquatic Ecosystem Studies and Stock Assessment
Socio Economic Objective 830199 Fisheries - Aquaculture not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30055286

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Life and Environmental Sciences
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